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Full text of "Ravelings"

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THE PHOENIX BIRD - sacred to the ancient 
Egyptians as a symbol of immortality and rebirth. 
This mythological creature reportedly lived for periods 
of five hundred years. After its life span, the Phoenix 
would be consumed in a self-inflicted funeral pyre. 
Flames of crimson, orange, and yellow engulfed the 
huge bird; it expired in a tremendous cloud of fire 
and smoke. When the ashes had cooled, there remained 
a small egg - and from this the new Phoenix emerged, 
reborn with strength and wonder superior to that 
which it had possessed before. 
. . . From the ashes of past glories, there emerges a 
new beginning - and hopes for a brighter future . . . 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/ravelings1972monm 





RflUELIJVGS 




Editor Barbara Oliphant 

Business Mgr. . . . Susan Currier 

Copy Editor Jane Kurtz 

Photo Editor . . . Katliy Hatzakis 

Art Editor Pat Lydiard 

Sports Editor .... Bob Mitcliell 

Photographers . . . Stuart Sniitii 

Rick Sciiaefer 

John Hayden 

Sudlow Studio 

Staff Edwina Borowski 

Ann Stcger 
Dixie Hemslcy 



Monmouth College 
Monmouth, III. 





Table of Contents 


Introduction 


4 


Student Life 


16 


Academics 


40 


Classes 


68 


Sports 


102 


Organizations 


124 


Conclusion 


160 


Index 


171 



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Tlie phoenix bird having 

gulped down new life 

from the rich stench 

of old ashes 

Wakes Up. 

His compounded knowledge 

sucked from old learning tubes 

touches 

our never-slaked parch 

for reawakening 

and new life. 

Tlie bird 

having cycle slept many times 

and yet 

each new night afraid 

nevertheless takes the plunge 

deepening into the ripples of 

night caves 

from which he will not emerge intact 

and only the egg nugget 

of his strength and wonder 

will be reborn. 





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I think maybe five-hundred 

is too many years for me 

still 

every night sees me tucked in 

and even red-eyed mornings 

let me crawl out reborn 

cumulative me. 

Even Monmouth suffers 

the uneven pangs of birth 

harder yet for 

having never learned to die. 




Tlie bird the school and I 

have never found a night 

which dried us out enough 

to shrivel wrinkled wake-thoughts 

from the mind. 

We go on living in the myth 

that someone 

treasures our rebirth each day 

and if we never heard differently 

we'd no doubt live forever 

waking. 






Awakening 

just ten more minutes 

rude shock jolt 

jarred awake 

soft, drowse-warmed 

security warmtli stripped 

covers 

broken dreams 

in jagged prisms 

over my 

senses meet world 

disorientation. 



freshman meet world 

senior meet world 

job book time value compromise 

dreams splattered in 

watermelon splatter warmth 

of old meet new meet old. 





10 





Wake up. 

orientation 
must lieip you once again to sciiool 
so tai<e my hand 
and I will be your teacher 
througii 

the maze of what you want and 
what you get. 

disorientation 
must help dispel the myth of school 
so take my hand 
and I will be your teacher 
through 

the maze of what you want and 
what you get. 
Wake up. 




11 



Alright, just five more minutes 
turn out the light again. 
The startle-shock bright white 
of its lightness 
rips my sleep-willed eyes 
clenched hard eyes 
clenched hard fist 
against the light 
let me slither into 
something more comfortable 
soft, avocado smooth peace 
of sleep. 




Alright, just ten more minutes 

the hands move on 

their touch ticks by 

take your time 

for sleep. 

I stand idly by watching 

the face I wanted to hold 

and what I wanted to be to you 

fall past 

stoned 

by the weight of your privacy 

my prince charming kiss lips 

withered 

by your restless dreams. 



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13 



Alright, fifteen more minutes 

the anesthetic sleep 

has reached your brain 

you smile 

reach out your hands 

to stretch 

to answer the question 

your lips know the words 

sleep-talking 

your brain is snoring in class 

you smile. 





14 







Sleep on, weary child 
No mama left 
(that bitchy, biting hand 
shaking at your shoulder) 
and you may sleep 
until you learn to set 
your own alarm. 



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STUDENT LIFE 



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17 




The battle begins as students swarm through the IBM 
processing. 



Sally Mc Wethy expresses the total bewil- 
derment felt by all students. 



Students Survive 
Another Registration 



Registration for the three terms at Monmouth College 
was held respectively in September, January and March. 
As usual, it turned into a mass mess of confused students 
who did not know which way to go or to whom to turn. 
The long lines seemed unending and only a very for- 
tunate few were able to extract helping information from 
fair faculty. However, intelligence reports have it that there 
were no fatalities in the bedlam. What a fruitless fury, 
for very shortly the add-drop slips would overcome all. 




The faculty awaits to receive prospective students for their courses. 




18 



HOMECOMING 1971 




Miss Jan Freeman receives the Queen's bouquet of roses from 
President Richard Stinc. 



The 1971 Homecoming theme, "Bring Yourself Home," prevailed 
over the Monmouth College campus October 21 through October 
23. The festivities began that Thursday evening with the film, 
The Strawberry Statement . Students used Friday, a specially 
designated X-day, to decorate dorms, build those special floats, 
catch up on lost sleep, and even do a "little" imbibing. Despite 
the rainy weather Friday night, the spirits of those who attended 
"Yell Like Hell" and the bonfire on the square were not dampened. 
In order that the queen and her court might reign at the football 
game Saturday, the results of the student voting were announced 
at the Friday night dance featuring the "Light Brigade." Miss Jan 
Freeman was crowned queen and Misses Jenny Gullion, Williet 
Griffen, Sue Mardjetko, and Cindy Crone were named to her court 
as senior, junior, sophomore, and freshman attendants, respectively. 
Saturday started off big with the morning parade of floats, bands, 
and administration down Broadway. A slight mist in the air did not 
deter the Monmouth Scots that afternoon on the football field 
when they trampled over the Knox Siwash 41-13, setting the 
perfect atmosphere for the many victory parties held afterwards. 
"The Association" in concert Saturday evening climaxed Home- 
coming 1971 for those many Monmouth students and alumni who 
had "brought themselves home." 




Through diligent work, the Zeta 
Beta Tau's and Kappa Kappa 
Gamma's earned first place in the 
Homecoming parade for their float 
"Scots Bring Yourself Home 
Another Victory." 



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19 



HOMECOMING QUEEN Jan Freeman and her attendants Cindy Crone, Freshman; Sue Mardjetko, Sophomore; 
Williet Griffin, Junior; Jenny Gullion, Senior are presented during halftime at the Monmouth vs. Knox 
football game. 




"Bring Yourself Home 



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The Bronze Turkey, which has made Mon- 
mouth its home for several years, will be here 
for yet another. The annual gridiron contest 
with Knox provided a victory for Monmouth 
and assured the Bronze Turkey of its old 
tlirone. 




Knox finds no room to move as tiie Homecoming spirit ignites Monmouth's defense. 



20 







"Tlie Association's" performance at the Homecoming concert was a) a real drag, b) a 
nostalgic revelation, c) a soul throbbing encounter. 




A Friday night bonfire ignited the spirit that prevailed over the 
victorious football game with Knox. 



A large student turnout anxiously awaits the harmony of "The Association.' 



21 



Winter Weekend, Monmouth's second 
holiday, was held over a four day period, 
February 10 through February 13. Be- 
ginning Thursday night with an all- 
school dance in the cafeteria featuring 
"Point Bland," Winter Weekend contin- 
ued on tlirough the long weekend. Fri- 
day classes were canceled at the pro- 
fessor's own discretion. That night in the 
Coffee House, David Craig, an MC stu- 
dent was billed for folk singing. The 
higlilight of the weekend was "The Win- 
ter Consort" musical group. Consisting 
of six young men who have developed 



an original style for instrumental music, 
the Consort plays classical, African and 
Eastern influences in jazz free-form man- 
ner. Following "The Winter Consort" 
performance, the cafeteria was trans- 
formed into a Reno-like atmosphere for 
aU students. A band, "Your Father's 
Moustache" played appropriate music to 
go along with a Roulette wheel, craps, 
high-lo dice and other casino games at 
hand. The Student Center Board con- 
cluded the weekend Sunday night with a 
film "The Learning Tree" shown in the 
auditorium. 



Winter 
Weekend 




22 







SCOT OLYMPICS, held each year during the spring, is open to any fraternity, 
sorority or independent team that wishes to participate in the various athletic 
events of rather unusual sorts. Pictured here are two sorority members competing 
in the "Ride Your Bike the Slowest" contest. A good crowd has gathered to cheer 
them on to victory. 



Scot Olympics 



The Kappa Delta girls kicked off the weekend at the Scot's Sing 
held in the gymnasium, Friday night, May 12. 



Tlie chmax of Scot Olympics came Saturday night when Monmouth College's 
own "Sound of Five" and "Swinging Scots" performed for the campus com- 
munity. 





23 



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Olympics 

Prove 

Amusing 



Chet Rodenbush displays unique style for 
catching ... a tossed egg! 




Mary Fogaity laps up cream pie in the Pie Eating contest. 




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24 




A shot of the starting line-up in the Men's Wheelbarrow Race. 



. ! 



Judie Collins and Debra Russell have it a bit easier than the men as they race to the finish for 
the Pi Phi's in the Women's Wheelbarrow Race. 



It's "heave-ho" for the Sig Ep's in the Tug of War 
contest. 





25 




MC Students Protest 

After President Nixon's speech in the spring stating his position on the mining of the Haiphong Harbor, students 
began relatively peaceful protests on campus. The student center remained open during the night for students to 
voice their opinions after Nixon declared his stand. During the following days a vote was taken of the student 
body and it was determined that Monmouth College would go on record in Washington as "On Strike." However, 
classes continued uninterrupted. In a rally held in the gymnasium, various guests, faculty members and students 
gave their pros and cons on Nixon's decision to an audience of MC students. In the photo above, students are 
shown following a march through the town square and campus. Below, students are pictured outside the student 
center as they protest in a quiet, but striking manner. 




26 




Pace For Pakistan 



Nearly 70 Monmoutli College students became involved with a 
cause by walking 16 miles for the Pakistani Refugee Relief 
Fund on a raining October 24, 1971. The marchers were 
pledged a certain amount of money per mile by other con- 
cerned individuals. The walkers departed as a group from the 
Student Center around 9:00 that Sunday morning. They 
marched to Coldbrook Church where they were served re- 
freshments by Saga. After relaxing their weary bodies, a 
slow procession of marchers headed home. Through their 
efforts almost SI 200 was raised to be converted into food- 
stuffs, clothing, medicines, and other desperately needed 
items for the Pakistani refugees. Though their feet were tired 
and their clothing wet, these students showed that they really 
cared. 



Dianne Randall, Brcnda Van Drie, and Tommy Mayer trudge on 
through the rain. 




Al Walker and Johanna Lee relax in the Styx after the 16 mile hike. 



Braving mist and mud, the marchers walk onward for the Pakistani cause. 








27 




BLINKY is seen most as he is being banished from the Student Center. However, here 
he has managed to escape all foes and relaxes on the Coffee House sofa. 




Fellow Friends 



LADY has gained fame on campus for her "love" of motorcycles. 
She insists on chasing every cycle and rider that comes within ear 
shot. 



■'Good grief! I just flunked Miss Liedman's speech class, again! 



An alleged prophet once stated that "man's best 
friend is the dog." One could not choose a place 
better than the Monmouth College campus to prove 
this statement. It seems as if student life is constantly 
being complicated by the barking canine friends who 
inhabit every place of residence. The Beatle's song, 
"Here, There, and Everywhere" certainly applies to 
the habitually underfoot phylum chordata, subphylum 
vertebrata, class mammalia, order carnivore, species 
canine, or more simply, the dog. 



WINDSOR looks around for fellow friends, whether they be 
canine or human. 



28 





Cflsr 



Prohuctioh SrnfF 



EUGENIA Jeannine Reade 

EDDIE Roger Yochelson 

EUGENE Keith Thompson 

ARTHUR David Nichols 

ELEANOR Sue Castagnoli 

STOMIL Cass Bartlett 

ALA Ann Steger 



Director and Designer 
Assistants to the Director 

Stage Manager 
Stage Crew 
Light Crew 

Sound and Music 

Properties 

Tickets and Publicity 

Poster and Program Design 

Matce-Up 

Costumes 



Mr. James L. DeYoung 
Nancy Day 
Joan Hayden 
Roger Blachek 
Roger Blachek 
Rick Johnson 
Gary Strong 
Rod Park 
Jim Beckman 
Pam Jamison 
Chuck Jackson 
Marcia Pittle 
Jeannine Reade 



THE MONMOUTH COLLEGE SPEECH DEPARTMENT 

and 
CRIMSON MASQUE 

presents 




TANCO 



by Slawomir Mrozek 
OCTOBER 28 -31, 1971 



29 



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Feste, a clown Doug Robinson 

Viola, sister to Sebastian Kari Krueger 

Sea Captain Blair Schultz 

Sailor David Nichols 

Orsino, Duke of Illyria Roger Yochelson 

Curio, a gentleman attending the Duke Greg DeGraf 



Maria, attendant to Olivia Dutchie WiUiams 

Sir Andrew Aguecheek, a foolish Knight . . Steven Van Anden 

Olivia, a Countess Cynthia Davis 

Malvolio, Olivia's Stewart Rick Krohe 

Antonio, a sea captain, friend to Sebastian Ooge 

Sebastian, brother to Viola Jon Dahl 



Valentina, a lady in the Court Gayla Smith Fabian, servant to Olivia David Nichols 



Courtiers Keith Thompson, Mark Edwards 

Lady of the Court Ann Steger 

Sir Toby Belch, uncle to Olivia Charles Jackson 



Attendants on Olivia Kendra Schank, Ellen Cooper 

Officers Blair Schultz, Mark Edwards 

Priest Keith Thompson 



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Director: Mr. James L. De Young 
Stage Design: Roger Blachek 
Lighting Design: Rick Johnson 
Assistants to the Director: Linda Russum, 
Jo Ann Quillinan 





Stage Eric Overcash, Lou Spencer 

Properties Debbie Hill 

Lighting Tom Martin 

Sound Steve Szabo 

Tickets, Publicity, Ushers Nancy Day 

Makeup Marcia Pittle 

Costumes Jeannine Reade 

Program Cover Pat Lydiard 



30 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE LITTLE THEATER 




DIRECTOR: Charles A. Jackson 
DESIGNER AND TECHNICAL DIRECTOR: Roger Blachek MUSICAL DIRECTOR: Ann Boley 

PIANIST: Debbie Weir DRUMMER: Alan Mertz 

ASSISTANT TO THE DIRECTOR: Marcia Pittle CHOREOGRAPHY: Ernest Burton, Mary Kunde 

* 

PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR: Mr. James L. De Young 



31 



Music Department Active 



'■■<:s, 




The Monmouth College Music Department presented a Jazz Concert on May 1 8 in the auditorium featuring the Wind/Jazz Ensemble, 
the Concert Jazz Band, an instrumental combo and the Sound of Five. Several jazz/rock compositions by students and faculty were the 
highlight of the event. 




Richaid L. Griffiths is pictured conducting the Community Choir and Wind Ensemble at one of their concerts given during the school 
year. 



32 



y 




Coffee 
House 



The Coffee House is just a large, spacious room in the SC equipped only with two sofas, a 
big chair, a piano and soft, wall-to-wall carpeting. Although this room is simple, it has a 
warm, comfortable feeling about it that makes everyone who enters ii welcome. Well suited 
for its purpose, the Coffee House was host to many different activities throughout the year. 
Pictured above is Murray Moulding, an MC English professor, as he reads poetry to a group 
gathered in the Coffee Flouse. 



Sharon, of the folk singing duo, "Bill and Sharon" of 
Canada, sings during a I-"riday, May 19 performance. 





Campus talent also performed in the Coffee House throughout the year. Here, a group of fellas 
make music while everyone listens. 



33 



Convocation Series 




Paul Simon, Lt. Governor of Illinois, appeared 
on the Monmouth campus on January 27 to a 
fairly large crowd of students and faculty 
members in spite of the heavy snow storm 
that plagued the vicinity. Mr. Simon, the Dem- 
ocratic candidate for governor of Illinois, made 
a short talk on the fallacies and abuses of our 
government. He is a highly thought of legisla- 
tor who has the interests of the people in 
mind. His special emphasis is on ethics in gov- 
ernment and he believes in speaking his own 
mind. Previously, his strong statements on cor- 
ruption in government angered fellow legisla- 
tors, but his supporters feel that his tenacity 
is to be admired. Only one year after his elec- 
tion in 1968, he introduced a bill to give 18 
year olds the privilege to vote. It appears ob- 
vious that Mr. Simon has the good of his con- 
stituents at heart. His legislative record in- 
cludes statements on the 18 year old vote, fis- 
cal responsibility, environment protection, min- 
imum wage, ethics and better government, and 
education. The Chicago Sun-Times has stated 
Paul Simon as having, "... a long and good 
record as a legislator and a deserved reputa- 
tion as a fighter for a clean government." Ac- 
cordingly, the Des Plaines Life has said, "Lt. 
Governor Paul Simon has a well deserved rep- 
utation for personal honesty, hard work, a 
genuine concern for the problems of Illinois 
and the ability and imagination to do some- 
thing about them." 




Fred Halsted, Chicago Peace CoaUtion rep- 
resentative, paid Monmouth College a visit 
on October 11, 71. Mr. Halsted has been 
activie in the "Bring the GI's Home" cam- 
paign since WW II and was the Socialist 
Party candidate in the 1968 Presidential 
Election. Other accomplishments obtained 
by Mr. Halsted include organizing the 
Washington D.C. May Day demonstrations 
in 1971 and the 1971 Chicago Anti-War 
demonstrations. 



34 




Abdeen Jabara, a second generation Arab 
and a successful Detroit lawyer, spoke to 
Monmouth students on February 16. In 
past experiences, Mr. Jabara was editor of 
the "Free' Palestine" newsletter, (a publi- 
cation in which the Palestinian point of 
view is expressed) and one of the defense 
lawyers for Sirhan Sirhan. He is also 
among a group of prominent North Amer- 
ican lawyers who advocate publishing data 
on the Mid-East Crisis that is comparable 
to the Pentagon Papers. Mr. Jabara's 
speech and following discussion mirrored 
his remarkable wit and resourcefulness on 
his subject. 




Thirty-one year old Linda Jenness appeared 
at Monmouth on October 6, 1971. At that 
time, she was currently the Socialist Work- 
er's Party candidate for president, althougli 
she was not yet at the minimum age for 
the office. She hoped that by running, she 
would draw attention to the phenomenon. 
A strong advocate for women's rights, anti- 
war protests and the 18 year old vote, she 
organized and participated in the Women's 
March on Washington. She believes very 
deeply in "The Militant" and stated that 
the principles found therein are what she 
lives by in her everyday life. Concerning 
women's rights, she feels that women are 
entitled to the freedom they riglitly deserve 
and have battled for for centuries. "It is 
time they get this freedom." 









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Acclaimed Actress Johanna 
Featherstone made an appearance 
on the Monmouth campus on 
Fcburary 9. The number of 
students who braved the winter 
wind outside and came to the 
show found Miss Feathcrstone's 
talent amazing, awe inspiring and 
thoroughly delightful. Few enter- 
tainers can be so talented and 
really make an audience feel in- 
cluded, but she was capable of 
this. Miss Featherstone called on 
members of the audience to dem- 
onstrate her qualities and from 
monologues, old 18th century 
Negro poems and modern day 
rhythemic chants, she gave every- 
one an evening well spent in the 
area of dramatic arts. Her talent.'; 
could not have been better re- 
ceived by a more captive audience 
than they were at her evening per- 
formance here in our auditorium. 



35 







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An event coordinated by Robb Wold in 
order "to create a situation that would 
increase a person's consciousness and 
thereby reduce his self-consciousness." 

An event featuring nearly 125 films, in- 
cluding "Punishment Park" and "War 
Games." 

An event featuring the Macomb Theater 
group "Have A Nice Day" directed by 
Chris Wahlberg. 

An event featuring an outdoor music 
festival consisting of 8 musical bands 
including "Enoch Smoke." 

An event made possible by many hard- 
working MC students and faculty to pre- 
sent the campus and community with 
an "awareness" that is rarely found at 
Monmouth." 



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Graduation '72 




Saturday, June 3, began early for the many 1972 
graduates and their parents. Commencement was to 
begin at 10 a.m., rather than 2 p.m. as in past years. 
The morning was warm as the hot sun beat down on 
Wallace Hall lawn with all those assembled for the 
commencement exercises. Students sought shelter in 
the shade as they waited for the lines to begin moving. 
Parents and children moved about seeking the best 
view from the coolest spot. Then, as the excitement 
and tension subsided, a calm settled over the area and 
the Pipers made their entrance. Commencement '72 
had begun. 

The audience rose as the distinguished faculty, hon- 
ored guests and graduates entered. The invocation 
was then given by the Reverend Harold H. McConnell, 
Jr., Pastor of the Lake Shore Presbyterian Church, 
St. Clair Shores, Michigan. Mr. William Blackie, Chair- 
man of Caterpillar Tractor Company, gave the com- 
mencement address. After various degrees and awards 
were conferred upon the recipients by Monmouth 
College President Richard D. Stine, the college hymn 
was sung, benediction was given, and the recessional 
was begun. "As a salute to the graduating seniors, 
members of the faculty. Senate, and honored guests 
formed a double line along the walk leading from 
Wallace Hall. The graduates then passed through, 
symbolizing completion of their undergraduate edu- 
cation and their step into the larger world." 
Then with a sigh of relief from all those present, 
graduation for 1972 was completed. 




38 




Burt Kamigaki gladly accepts degree in Biology from Dr. Stine. 
Monmouth College Highlanders lead processional at graduation. 





Proud parent talks with son after graduation exercises. 



39 



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^ 




ACADEMICS 



41 



ADMINISTRATION 




Mrs. H. A. Loya works with Dr. Stine as Administrative Assistant to the President. 



Dr. Richard D. Stine, President 




Presidents Office 




Dean^s Office 



Witold Novak, Director of Audio-visual Services 



F'-om Left: Dr. R. Jeremy McNamara, Asso- 
ciate Dean of the College; Dr. Frank S. 
McKenna, Dean of the College. 




John E. Nichols, Registrar, Instructor of Speech 
(part-time) 



43 




Dr. Daniel W. Behring, Dean of Students 




Miss E. Sue Metzger, Associate Dean of Students 



Student Personnel 
Services 




Mrs. James Humphrey, Director of the Student 
Center 



The Reverend Paul H. McClanahan, Chaplain 



44 






From Left: Dr. D. Wilson Taylor, Medical Director, Health Center; Gertrude Warner, 
Nurses Aide, Health Center; Ceola Holland, Head Nurse, Health Center 



Carolyn A. Wilson, Assistant to the Dean of Students 




Hwood Ball, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Career Development discusses job op- 
portunities with student Becky Buchen. 



Dr. James W. Marshall, Medical Director, Health Center; 
Not Pictured: Dr. James B. Ebersole, Medical Director, 
Health Center 



45 



Eail Daniel, Director of Admissions 




Admissions Office 



Donald W. Kettering, Director of Student Financial Aid 




46 



Development Office 




John A. M. Brown, Director of Program Services 



47 




William Hutchins, Supervisor of Office Services 



Business 
Office 





Richard O. Hildreth, Director of Personnel and Purchasing 



From Left: Robert L. Wintcler, Director of Physical Plant; 
Gordon K. Young, Director of Data Processing ||||^ 



Robert H. Bamett, Vice President for I'inance and Business 




James A. Blender, Controller 



48 




FACULTY 



Art 



From Left: Harlow B. Blum, Associate Professor, 
Chairman; George L. Waltershauscn, Instnictor 





Margaret Matthews, Lecturer 



From Left: Katharine P. Boone, Lecturer; G. E. Boone, Lecturer 




Robert H. Buchholz, Professor, Chairman, demonstrates a delicate 
instrument to Mary Auliff. 



Biology lab students work diligently as they learn to make precise 
microscopic observations. 





Biology 



From Left: Benjamin F. Cooksey, Assistant Professor; John J. Kettcrer, Professor; Milton L. Bowman, Associate Professor; 
David C. Allison, Associate Professor 




50 




Chemistry 



Qucntin R. Petersen, Professor, Chairman 



From Left: Berwyn E. Jones, Associate Professor; Terry M. Nagel, Assistant Professor 





, 7 



V 



51 




East Asian 
Studies 



Classical Languages 



Bernice L. Fox, Professor, Chairman 



Cecil C. Brett, Director of East Asian Studios 




52 




Economics 
and Business 
A dministration 



From left: Dewey Woodull, Instructor; Hans Theurer, Instructor 




Homer L. Shoemaker, Lecturer 



James R. Herbsleb, Professor, Chairman 




53 



Education 




From Left: Qiailes E. Wingo, Professor; Benjamin T. Shawver. Professor, Qiairman; Vo N. Lin, Lecturer (part-time); Lee E. 
Pelham, Counselor and part-time instructor of Psychology; Fred M. Knoche, Associate Professor 




From Left: Dr. Shawver talks with Julie Littler and Karen Finch during an informal tea held for second term graduates and fac- 
ulty in the Coffee House. 



54 





Gary D. Willhardt, Assistant Professor, Qiairman 



Murray B. Moulding, Instructor 



English 




Geology 



From Left: Lyman O. Williams, Associate Professor; Donald L. 
Wills, Associate Professor, Chairman 




56 




Government 




From Left: Cecil C. Brett, Professor; Chi Y. Lin, Assistant Professor 



Roy M. McClintock, Associate Professor, Chairman 




From Left: Douglas R. Spitz, Associate Professor; Mary B. Crow, Assistant Professor; F. Garvin Davenport, Professor 




William L. Urban, Assistant Professor, Chairman 



History 



From Left: Cecil C. Brett, Professor; George D. Tselos, Assistant 
Professor 




57 




Mathematics 



John D. Arrison, Assistant ftotessor 





David L. Ehlert, Assistant Professor 



From Left: Paul Cramer, Associate Professor; Carol V. Brasel, Lecturer 



58 








From Left: Edenia Guillermo, Associate Professor of Spanish; Helen V. Fritschi, Instructor of German; Karen M. Woodward, Instructor of 
French; Robert A. Gordon, Assistant Professor of Spanish. 



Modern Foreign Languages 





C. Margaret Hastings, Instructor of French, (left) discusses a paper with her 
student Marcia Ohlinger. 



Harry W. Osborne, Professor of French, Chairman 



59 



Music 




Thomas J. Ryan, Instructor 




Grace Gawthrop Peterson, Lecturer (part-time) 




From Left: Michael E. Sproston, Instructor; Richard L. Griffiths, Assistant Professor 




Heimo A. Loya, Professor, Chairman 



60 




J. Prescott Johnson, Professor, Chairman 



Samuel M. Thompson, Professor 



Philosophy 





Dr. Samuel M. Thompson addressed an assembly of 
students and faculty with a speech, "Are College 
Professors Obsolete?", at the Honors Convocation 
held in the Monmouth College Auditorium on 
March 29, 1972. 



61 





Mary H. Fleming, Instructor, helps Gail Lowes with some 
stopwatches. 



Jack M. Steger, Chaiiman and Director of Athletics 



Physical Education 



William L. Reichow, Assistant Professor 



James L. Wascm, Assistant Professor 



Robert G. WoU, Associate Professor 






62 




From Left: William J. NeUis, Assistant Professor; Peter K. Kloeppel, Assistant Professor 




Physics 



A. Franklin Johnson, Professor, Chairman 



63 



Psychology 






David J. Senn, Assistant Professor, Chairman 



From Left: Cliarles J. Meliska, Assistant Professor; William M. 
Hastings, Assistant Professor 



A. Dean Wright, Assistant Professor, 
talks casually with student, David Keith, 
in the psychology lab. 



64 





Religion 



Charles J. Speel II, Professor, Chairman 



From Left: J. Stafford Weeks, Professor; Paul H. McClanahan, Chaplain, Assistant Professor 




65 



Sociology 




Sociology students Frank Katz, John Meers, Kathy Long, and Barb Helmick work to attain a better understanding of social problems. 




From Left: Dean G. Epley, Professor, Oiairman; Won M. Hurh, Associate Professor; Richard S. Herman, Instructor; Not Pictured: 
William M. Hastings, Assistant Professor. 



66 



i 

^1 




Speech 




John R. Foxcn, Professor, Chairman 



Jean E. Liedman, Professor 




James L. DeYoung, Assistant 
Professor, shows Jeannine 
Spaulding and other students 
simple stage directions. 



67 



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69 



SENIORS 



James Anderson 
Judy Anderson 
Michael Armstrong 



Carmen Audet 
Mary Lou Auliff 
Susan Bahnick 



Richard Balfanz 



Wayne Banwell 




70 




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Scott Baranski 
Rusty Barker 
Joseph Bartlow 
Colin Basler 



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Linnea Bass 
Maggie Bass 
Timothy Bath 



Chris Bayer 
David Belke 
Paul Bemko 



71 






William Bencini 
Charles Berg 
Deborah Berles 



Hubert Bernet 
James Biggs 
Ted Blanchard 




I 



72 



William Bluder 
David Booth 
Jerrold BorchardI 




Sheryl Brinton 
Dale Brooks 



Connie Brouillette 
Richard Brown 
David Byrnes 



73 



James Caldwell 
Michael Calvin 
Marsha Campbell 



Michael Center 
Joseph Cicarone 
Ann Clark 



Sally Collier 



Bradley Congdon 




74 




Joyce Conte 
James Cooke 
Richard Corn 



Susan Covic 
William Daniel 
Marietta Dawson 



75 



Eric Degerberg 
Greg DeGraf 
Jacques de Journo 




Thomas Dodge 
Charles Donovan 
Michael Doyle 



76 




Nancy Dunn 

Mary Ann Eiserman 

Robert Eiserman 



Paul Evans 
John Fenn 
Marshall Fenton 



Karen Finch 
Alfred Flesh 
Wayne Forsberg 



Jeffrey Fort 
Daniel Fowler 
Donna Frank 



77 



Robert FuUerton 
Robert Gentile 
Michael Goodwin 



Charles Gould 
Ed Greene 
Guy Gregg 



William Groff 
Jennifer GulUon 
Terry Gunzinger 



Diane Guzzi 
Pleasance Haake 
Valerie Hagenstein 




78 



Lucille Harris 
Christine Heaton 
Randy Heern 




79 



Carol Hladik 
Meliiida Hopkins 
Ruth Hund 



Lucy Hyde 



Rosemary Isaacson 



Mary Sue Iverson 
Martin Jahnel 
Karl Jennrich 




80 




Becky Johnson 
GaiJ Johnson 
Rick Johnson 



Stephen Johnson 
Barbara Johnston 
Edward Jones 



Janet Joslyn 
Martin Katz 
Toni Kauzlarich 



Stephen Keithley 
David Kinney 
Pat Kipp 



81 



Patricia Kite 
Teresa Kolb 
Karen Krueger 



Joseph Kucharz 
Mary Kunde 
Claudia Lawson 




William Lealion 
Katherine Lenhart 
Jeri Lind 




Kathleen Long 
Francis Lorenz 
Patricia Lydiard 




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82 



Gary Macari 
Larry Macari 
Robert Manner 




83 



Jan Michael 
Robert Michael 
Edward Mikula 



Harold Mitchell 
Robert Mitchell 
Thomas Mitchell 



Thomas Mogan 
Marianne Molendy 
Douglas Moody 



Wesley Morris 
Calvin Moy 
George Mulville 




84 




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Anne Nelson 
Carolyn Nelson 
Jacqueline Novak 



Craig Patterson 




Nancy Peterson 
Virginia Plunkett 
David Powers 



85 



Sally Probert 
Gaye Reiser 
Gordon Robertson 



David Robinson 
Ernest Roggelin 
Robert Ruff 



Mary Ryder 
Mark Sager 
Linda Salvato 



Mary Sanders 
Sarah Scarritt 
Frederick Schaefer 




86 




Nancee Schiever 
Blair Schultz 
John Scotillo 



Reginald Seiders 
Sherman Smith 
Lee Ann Smoley 



Ann Stephens 
Pamela Stepuchin 
James Stutz 



Hugh Sumner 
Antonia Szowkowyh 
Catherine Taylor 



87 



Marsha Theisen 
Gregory Theobald 
Susan Thomas 



Thomas Thomas 
Paul Titus 
David Traff 



Samuel Trigillo 
Barbara Vana 
Joy Volz 



Eric Wagner 
Linda Wagner 
Katharine Wakolbinger 




88 



Lola Walsh 
Carol West 
David Wliitcomb 




89 



UNDERGRADS 



Karen Ajamian '73 
Kathryn Alexander '75 
Andrew Allen '75 
Theodore Allen '74 



Tom Anderson '74 
Karen Avalos 74 
Susan Bansberg '73 
Carl Barnett '74 



Victoria Bautch '74 
James Beckman '73 
Michael Beezley "73 
Joseph Belmonte 74 




90 



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David Bengtson 75 
Janet Bingham '73 
Patrick Blake '74 
Edvvina Borovvsld 73 



Bruce Borsom 75 
Tlielma Brewer 74 
David Brittain 73 
Mary Ann Brooks '75 



Rosemary Bryce '73 
J. Patrick Buchen 74 
Martlial Burr '73 
William Buttner 75 



Robin Calvin 75 
Cynthia Carman 73 
Susan Ciistagnoli 75 
Dennis Clark 75 



Kenneth Collier '74 
Carla Connolly 74 
Frank Cook 73 
Samuel Corallo '75 



91 



Marilyn Cotterman 73 
Scott Crawford 73 
Shannon Custer 75 
Patricia Dillin 75 



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Debbie Drain 73 
Ann Dryden 75 
Alice Dunlap 75 
Candice DuRoss 74 



Dane Duval 73 
Edward Dzenis 73 
Charles Easterly 75 
Mark Edwards 74 



Gregory Ellis 73 
David Elmer 73 
Nancy Erickson 75 
Richard Farmer 75 



Stephen Fay 74 
Lloyd Fish 74 
Jane Fort 75 
PhyUis Foster 74 




92 




Margaret Fottler 75 
Alice Francis '75 
Leah Friedman 73 
Jim Fulton 75 



Dave Funk 74 
Donna Gardiner 75 
Bruce Gilmore 74 
Patricia Gladstone 74 



Oaudia Glover 74 



Joyce Grant 75 



Mary Grimes 73 
Avis Guldenpfennig 75 
Dan Hall 74 
Scott Hamilton 75 



93 



Ross Hart 73 
Stephen Hart "74 
Katharine Hatzakis 74 
Nancy Hayward 73 



Jon Herber 73 
Thomas Hillison 73 
Frederick Hoadley 75 
Dianne Hogan 75 



Judy Hogfeldt 75 



Stcplicn Holder 75 



Brcnda Holloway 74 




94 




Michael Huber 75 
Janice Hultgren '74 
Katherine Hutchinson 73 
Susan Jacobs 75 



Marjorie Johnson 73 
Henry Kabat 74 
Barbara Kallas 74 
Denise Karczcwski 75 



D-aniel Karl 73 
Edic Kern 74 
Stanley Kijek 75 
Anne Kimber 75 



Jeffrey King 73 
Laurel King 75 
Jean Klenk 73 
Randy Kopper 74 



Pat Kubina 75 
John Lannan 74 
Charles Larrabee 75 
Johanna Lee 75 



95 



Kenneth Leslie '75 
Mary Leslie 74 
Susan Lewis 75 
Diane Locandro 75 



Vicki Lowder 74 
Lucy Lucas 75 
Kathryn Lucder 75 
Norman Lydiard 75 



Lynnc Mahnic 73 
Jean Malsbury 73 



Stephen Marcus 73 
Jurlean Market 74 



Precious Mays 73 
Trudy Mercer 73 
Wendy Messenger 74 
Mary Ann Meyer 75 




96 



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David Mongan '75 
Sonia Montgomery '75 
Deborah Moran '75 
Rebecca Morgan '73 



Maureen Mostyn '75 
Cathy Moyers 75 
Anne Murray '75 
Bill Murschel '75 



Andrew Muzik '74 
Linda Nelson '75 



Vicky Nelson 75 
Barbara Oliphant 73 



Ronald Ozga '74 
Rodney Park 75 
Carol Parker '75 
Steven Paulson '75 



97 



Deborah Peaco '73 
Victoria Peel '73 
Gary Peevler '74 
Bernard Piechalak '75 



Edward Porento '75 
Mike Pospischil '73 
Zenobia Prigh '73 
William Pyatt '75 



Ann Quick '74 
Dianne Randall '74 
Diane Rankins '75 
Michael Richards '75 



Jayne Richcy '75 
Bob Ritthaler '74 
Douglas Robinson '75 
Chet Rodenbush '73 



Kevin Sager '75 
Abbas Saljmian '73 
Bccki Salzman '74 
Drucilla Sawyer '75 




98 



Kendra Schank 75 
Dcbra Schneider '75 
Joseph Schurr 75 
Daniel St'amurri 75 



Carl Shaub 73 
Allen Shepherd 74 
Diannc Sheppard 75 
Debi Shipplett 73 




99 




Rebecca Station '74 
Karen Steele 75 
Ann Steger '75 
Stephen Stone '74 



Donald Storrs '73 
Barbara Sullivan '75 
Keith Thompson '74 
Susan Triner '75 



Richard Truog 74 
Julie Van Qeve '75 
Deborah Vanderwilt 
Paul Wajda 75 



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100 




Robin Waldron '74 
Jacki Walter '73 
Jerry Wanless 75 
Cindy Wead '73 



Shirley Weaver '74 
Daniel Weber '74 
Jim Wheeler '73 
Debra Whitaker '74 



Delorcs Whitaker '73 
Darlene Wilhams '75 
Gloria Wilson '74 
Gordon Yocum '73 



Delsie Young '75 
Sally Young '75 



Beatrice Zavorski '74 
I William Zimmerman '73 



101 




103 



Scots Secure First Place Tie 



In the 1971 campaign, the Monmouth College Fighting Scots 
football team gained a tie for first place in the Midwest Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Conference. With an exceptional record of 
8 wins and 1 loss, the team proved to be a formidable adver- 
sary for all of the conference schools. The only loss was to St. 
Olaf in a hard-fought battle at Northfield, Minnesota. 

In the pre-season rankings, Monmouth was placed near the top 
of the conference. However, the team went out to prove that 
it was even better. With this prediction in mind the Scots col- 
lected a total of 3 1 1 points while allowing their adversaries 
only 79 points. 

Unlike last year's starting line-up, the team consisted largely 
of underclassmen. The second string was also complimented 
with several underclassmen, all of whom showed their ability 
to fill in when needed. The Scots' biggest asset was the abun- 
dance of running backs, who were endowed with power and 
speed. Coach Reichow used them to the teams advantage by 
frequently changing players, allowing a well-deserved rest for 
those in action. 

The team was also nationally ranked, being in the top 6 in both 
offense and defense. The team's offense was seldom held back 
for any length of time, providing the fans with a variety of for- 
mations and plays. Coach Reichow's awesome defensive squad 
also did more than its share of providing action. Defensively, 
our team proved themselves worthy of their national ranking 
by stunting the adversaries forward progress and coming up 
with big plays, aiding in our first place conference tie. 




John Carter runs around end for good yardage. 



Monmouth's awesome defense again denies St OlaTs offense. 



104 





FROM LEFT: ROW 1: T. Gunzinger, T. MitcheU, G. Drije, D. Brooks, P. Hennigan, M. Reynolds, G. GUson, B. Thompson. ROW 2: Coach WoU, B. 
Bencini, S. Rueckert, K. Jennrich, C. Goehl, J. Kuchaiz, P. Bemko, L. Stryjewski, D. Brinker, Coach Wasem. ROW 3: D. Aveiy, T. Kratochvil, M. 
Birkhofer, J. Longer, D. Plummer, M. Pospischil, T. Biirk, B. Dusek, P. Waszak, Coach Raicevich. ROW 4: J. Whitmore, K. Camp, T. Roy, M. 
Rueckert, B. Honeycutt, G. Pynckel, J. Buell, G. Peevler, J. Pisani, M. Curran, J. Carter, Coach Stager. ROW 5: Coach Reichow, T. Meyers, J. 
Stotlar, R. Gladinus, W. Wilson, W. Nelson, A. Shepherd, B. Pratt, R. Ozga, B. Trombetta, M. Dickens, R. Davies. 





Safety Mike Dickens hampers receiver. 



Scots' Al Shepherd jumps to complete a pass and gains yardage. 



105 




FROM LEFT: Tri-Captains Greg Drije, Dale Brooks and Pat Hennigan with Coach Reichow. 



VARSITY SCOREBOARD 



Scots defense again proves fatal to opposition. 






Opponent 


Monmouth 


Grinnell 





13 


Coe 





29 


Lawrence 





41 


Carleton 


6 


63 


Cornell 


15 


17 


Knox 


13 


47 


Ripon 


6 


27 


St. Olaf 


33 


21 


Beloit* 


6 


57 


*non-cor 


ference 





106 



L.^m^, 




: I 



Wcescot defcnscman Scot Bills lunges at an Augustana receiver. 



Freshmen Sport 
2-1 Record 



Again this year the Wee Scots football team was loaded with 
talent. There were members of both the offensive and defen- 
sive squads who will prove to be assets for the varsity team 
next season. 

Having only 3 games, the freshmen recorded 2 wins and 1 loss. 
All games were hard fought battles and win or lose, the team 
showed fine spirit and determination. 



FROSH SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Knox 


14 


27 


Augustana 


2 


13 


Coe 


7 


6 



FROM LEFT: ROW 1: D. Bengston, S. Bills, F. Duchon, D.Pitanello, J. Unterfranz. ROW 2: R. Bevans, T. Brown, S. MeUekas, G. Minor, D. Means, 
M. Cripe. ROW 3: M. Gliva, W. Callahan, J. Lowe, J. Rose, B. Crooks, M. Huber, J. Schurr, A. Scribner. ROW 4: D. Davis, G. Derbak, S. Sandifer, M. 
Serruto, T. Benka, T. Miller, D. Clark. ROW 5: A. Williams, M. Entrup, J. Crum, Z. Stamp. ROW 6: Coach Wasem, B. Groff, manager, B. Handel, C. 
Helmick, E. Toliver, Coach Steger, E. Kiinsky, Coach Weber, S. Pinkus, M. Kuhnkey, K. Staley. 




107 




Jim Wheeler in control of situation over Knox opponent. 



VARSITY SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Lewis 


3 


43 


Loras 


14 


29 


Milwaukee A.T. 


3 


49 


Carthage 


19 


14 


MacMurray Inv. 




3rd 


CorneU 


19 


16 


Coe 


18 


18 


Carthage 


15 


16 


Grinnell 





51 


Parsons 


15 


23 


Lawrence 


13 


22 


Ripon 


12 


33 


Carleton 


3 


32 


Wheaton 


21 


19 


St.Olaf 


19 


18 


Knox 


6 


39 




Steve Waecker begins to manhandle the opposition. 



108 



Grapplers Sport Fine Record 




The 1972 Varsity Wrestling Team again provided Monmouth 
College with a winning record. The team's effort gave Coach 
B'll Reichow an impressive final record of 12 wins - 4 losses - 
1 tie. Some early season injuries might have been the only 
factor deterring the team from an undefeated season and a 
conference championsltip. The squad compiled enough points 
for a third place finish at both the MacMurray Invitational and 
the Mid-West Conference finals. Each time, first and second 
places were barely out of reach. 

Our "grapplers" consistently showed the opposition that the 
Scots were a team not easily beaten. The opposition saw that 
individual victories for our squad would be many; for the 
Scots frequently out-classed the opposing team early in the 
match. 



Kerry Willis prepares to pin Siwash opponent. 



From Left: Row 1: J. Wheeler, Captain M. Calvin, M. Castillo, K. Willis, G. Waccker, M. Adkinson, Coach Reichow. Row 2: K. Staley. M. Corray, B. Trombct- 
ta, K. Kiueger, S. Waecker, R. Bevans, M. Vacala, T. Kratochvil. 




109 



Scots Place Third in Conference 



Monmouth's Varsity Basketball Squad finished their season 
with the best record in several years and a third place finish in 
the Mid-West Conference. There are many reasons for tliis 
"best in years" record. First is that four of the five starters 
were seniors, all with the experience and ability to play good 
ball. Reason two was the height of the sophomore center, who 
constantly helped the other starters make the big plays, all the 
while gaining valuable experience. Third was the ability of aU 
of our ball-players, including those on the well-stocked bench, 
to work as a team and use each other for the teams advantage. 
The fourth and final reason is, perhaps, the most important. 
This is the desire to win and a team and school spirit that is 
inexpressible. Added support from the fans only ignited this 
already explosive spirit. 

Our team was in first place for the majority of the season, 
even thougli the lead was often shared with Ripon and/or St. 
Olaf. It wasonly in the last few games that the team lost 
ground, but still retaining their third place finish. On their way 
to this third place finish, our men shot 48.1% of their field- 
goals and averaged 64.9% from the free-throw line. 





Senior Mark Sager goes for two unhampered. 



Mark Sager stretches to make rebound against Bcloit. 



Sophomore star, Don Hunter is up for a goal. 



110 





From Left: Row 1: B. Patterson, S. Eilers, D. Swanson, M. Sager, D. Corn, D. Hunter. Row 2: Coach Wascm, J. Whitmore, D. Meckfesscl, E. Liinn, P. 
Buchen, Coach Woll. Not Pictured; O. Seip. 



Steve Eilers picks off a rebound with Dick Corn poised for action. 



Senior Dave Swanson goes for a bucket in a crowd. 





Ill 



J 



VARSITY SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Florida Presbyterian 


89 


73 


Georgia S. W. 


64 


82 


Grinell 


59 


73 


Lawrence 


77 


93 


Ripon 


69 


70 


Knox 


71 


87 


Cornell 


65 


66 


Coe 


72 


73 


Beloit 


86 


66 


Grinell 


52 


87 


Cornell 


69 


71 


Carleton 


80 


100 


St.Olaf 


75 


89 


Carleton 


82 


56 


St.Olaf 


102 


64 


Coe 


78 


79 


Beloit 


57 


70 


Knox 


92 


81 


Lawrence 


38 


52 


Ripon 


71 


69 




Sager goes up for a rebound. 




Don Hunter outjunips opponent for a rebound. 



112 




From Left: Row 1; M. Hutmacher, J. Tancredi, B. Schlicksup, D. Stickles, N. Ralph, B. Aten. Row 2: Coach Woll, J. Bayer, S.Pennucci, L. Pavonc, B. Bessert, 
T. Gillhouse, M. Smith, W. Meyers. Not pictured: J. Hohnstone, B. Dalton. 



Frosh Finish 4-4 




This year the Wee Scot Basketball team averaged over 80 
points a game, while allowing the opposition only 76. The 
team made 42% of their shots from the floor and averaged 
64% from the free throw line. The height on the Freshman 
team wUl also be an asset to the Varsity squad next year. The 
skill seen of the Frosh Team, as well as the yet undeveloped 
skills that experience brings, wiU be beneficial to the Varsity 
squad. The men that make next years Varsity squad will un- 
doubtedly provide the spectator with another exciting season. 



FROSH SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Carl Sandburg J.C. 


78 


69 


Knox 


72 


56 


Coe 


70 


98 


GrinneU 


65 


82 


Cornell 


74 


100 


Carl Sandburg J.C. 


91 


95 


Augustana 


71 


67 


Knox 


86 


71 



Wee Scot T. Gillhouse reaches for a rebound. 



113 



Swimmers Faced Com^petition 



^▼i !•! J 1 7i 1919M i : {HH*] m m =(cl : 



kriVii;^ 




From Left: Row 1: Captain E. Wagner, D. Hardin, D. Robinson. Row 2: Coach Reyner, D. Brown, S. 
Purington, S. Hart. Row 3: C. Blythe, E. Degerberg, C. Stach, T. AUen, A. Kircher, R. Yochelson. 



Dave Robinson displays excellent form. 






I 



The Monmouth College swim team improved over last year's 
record ; this year compiling a record of 4 wins and 1 losses. 
At first glance, this record may not seem impressive, yet it is 
not always the final standings which provide merit for a team. 
The men on the team constantly provided their opponents 
with stiff competition and their fans with excitement. The 
team is to be congratulated for their fine efforts, some of 
which break the existing school records. As usual, the swim 
team was small but with the spirit of the team, with each 
other, and with their opponents, they made up for the small 
numbers. 



SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Illinois College 


25 


79 


Knox 


61 


47 


Rockford 


99 


22 


Augustana 


86 


21 


E. Illinois College 


98 


14 


Beloit 


24 


86 


CorneU 


66 


47 


Grinnell 


75 


28 



114 





SCOREBOARD 



Southern Illinois 
University 

Southern Illinois 
University 




Opponent 
21 

5 




Monmouth 





Knox 
Knox 








4 
1 




3 
6 


Cornell 
CorneU 








1 

1 




10 

7 


Coe 
Coe 








1 
1 




2 
2 


Cornell 
Cornell 








2 

1 




7 
8 


Knox 
Knox 








8 
3 




7 
5 


St.Olaf 
St.Olaf 








3 
8 





6 


All games with Grinnell were forfeited. The 
second pair of games with Coe were not played. 



Joel Vistein swings for a hit. 



Baseball Wins Southern Division 




From Left: Row 1: B. Aten, B. Wagner, B. Seiple, G. Fritz, A. Shepherd, J. Vistein, B. Bennett, B. Eiserman. Row 2: Coach Wasem, L. Greenwald, G. De- 
Bouck, D. Avery, D. Brooks, M. Swartz, B. Brown, S. Ruekert, R. Hode, T. Satterly, P. Jordan. Row 3: R. Lehmann, J. Unterfranz, J. Hode, M. Ruekert, M. 
Qipe, T. Mayer, M. Entrup, M. Richards, R. Anderson, A. Allen, L. Huddle, B. Bencini. 



115 




Jordon swings as he keeps an eye on the ball. 




k .^^ttKv;H«u«UN.~ ^"•^ %rwy j Mtat» i 





Brown prepares before a home game. 






116 



"•% 




Left-hander Rich Hode prepares to 
dehver a powerful pitch. 



Steve Rueckert displays form while 
getting a hit against Cornell. 



Again this year the Figliting Scots baseball team under Coach 
Jim Wasem won the Southern Division of the Midwest Con- 
ference. With a record of 1 2 wins and 2 losses, the Scots 
earned the riglit to play St. Olaf for the MWC Championship. 
The Scots had already won the Southern Division title, so the 
last 2 games against Coe were unnecessary to play. The team 
lost 2 tougli games to St. Olaf, despite their fine pitching, 
great defensive plays and good hitting. Each game they played 
provided their many fans with the necessary ingredients to a 
good season. The action, excitement and team spirit made 
every game a thrill to watch. 

The batting statistics were better in general this year, despite 
the fact that there was no big slugger. The batters provided the 
team with good averages and a number of good pitchers. The 
starters were always able to rely on their relief if it wasn't 
their day. Extraordinary defensive plays and strategic moves 
made victory possible. The strategy belonged to Coach Wasem, 
the plays to the men. 



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117 



Track 

Team Rebuilds 

The Fighting Scots track team was under the leadership of a 
new coach, Jack Steger, this year. The team was young with 
only a few returning lettermen and several freshmen. Those 
returning were sophomores, with no juniors or seniors. Coach 
Steger had limited facilities with which to work and only a 
smaU group of men who fought hard to gain victory. Because 
the team was so small, most of the men had to participate in 
three or more events. The team of young, inexperienced men 
provided their fans with a display of fortitude and persever- 
ance which is not oftenwitnessed. Coach Steger has high hopes 
for next year with his returning men. There are a number of 
good prospects to possibly provide a winning season. 

The 1972 track team consisted of the following men. 

Tom Anderson - captain 

Dave Bengston 

Bruce Brown 

John Hayden 

Mike Huber 

Gary Peevler 

Steve Pospichil 

Bob Siefen 

Zack Stamp 

Jim Whitmore 




SCOREBOARD 



Momnouth 


Opponent 


Opponent 


11 


Coe 95 


Cornell 52 


60 


IW 68 


IC 50 


42 


Knox 97 




37 


Knox 107 




36'/^ 


IW 871/i 


Parson 42 



118 




Dr. Urban is shown with his team after a late spring meeting. 



Soccer Sports Fine Record 




Coach Urban and his soccer team again fought out a tough 
schedule on the soccer field. At Monmouth College, soccer is 
only in club form, but the team played against schools which 
had varsity soccer programs. There are two significant facts 
concerning the team which surprise many fans. Number one is 
that all the members of the team learned to play soccer at MC; 
none had any previous experience. Fact number two is that 
the team was very young; only freshmen and sophomores fin- 
ished the season. However, this provides Coach Urban with 
great hopes for next year's team. The team, through pride and 
determination, wound up the season winning 3, losing 6 and 
tying 3 games. 



SCOREBOARD 



Fighting Scotsman keeps ball in play with head. 



FALL 


0pp. 


MC 


SPRING 0pp. 


MC 


Grinnell 


2 


2 


LS.U. 2 


1 


Knox 


3 


3 


YMCA 4 
Springfield 


2 


CorneU 


2 


2 


Shimer 2 


5 


Bradley 


4 


1 


WJ.U. 4 


2 


LS.U. 


4 


2 


LS.U. 2 


4 


Coe 





1 


YMCA 8 
Springfield 


3 



119 



Tennis Team Takes Second 



The 1972 tennis team had the best year in recent memory. 
The real thrill came during the Midwestern conference meet, 
when they were placed in a three-way tie for second place with 
Grinnell and Ripon College. Monmouth went on to win the tie. 
This accomplishment has proven that Monmouth can build a 
strong tennis team tradition. Though their record for the reg- 
ular season could have been better (3 wins - 2 losses), the po- 
tential for improvement is surely here. With four returning 
lettermen next year and a new coach, the program will con- 
tinue to build. The team and the entire tennis community 
would like to thank Coach Cal Evans for his active involve- 
ment with them. 



SCOREBOARD 





Opponent 


Monmouth 


Parsons 


8 


7 


Ambrose 


6 


2 


Cornell 


1 


8 


Augustana 


7 


2 


Knox 


2 


7 


Coe 


2 


7 


Grinnell 


6 


3 


Western 


8 


1 




Beezley smashes serve across net to opposing player. 




From Left; Row 1: D. Boyd, J. Huey, E. Degerberg, C. Lesniak. Row 2: M. Beezley, R. Karcher, Coach Cal Evans, B. 
Fuessle, J. Sorenson. 



120 




From Left: G. Minor, R. Wells, S. Gawford, J. Angis, J. Shea, N. Lydiard, Coach Bill Reichow. 



Golf Team Under New Coach 



SCOREBOARD 



Knox 
Coe 


Opponent 
9 


Monmouth 

12'/2 

9 


CorneU 
Coe 


3 
3 


12 
15 


Grinnell 
Knox 


15 

10'/2 


3 

7'/2 


Knox 
Coe 


14!/2 

2>/2 


6'/2 
18'/2 


Augustana 
Miliken 


424 strokes 
402 strokes 


402 strokes 
402 strokes 


Illinois College 
Greenville 


m 
31/2 


6>/2 
11/2 


Blackburn 


2 


13 



The golf team showed Improvement over last years squad, pos- 
sibly due to a greater number of participants in this sadly 
neglected sport at Monmouth College. In past years the sparse 
number of athletes who took part in this sport made it diffi- 
cult for the team and coach alike. This year a larger group 
wished to participate in golf and a selective process was insti- 
tuted. Under the new coach, Bill Reichow, the team sported a 
6 won, 4 lost, and 2 tie record. Competition for a place on the 
team kept our men in readiness throughout the season. 



121 



Womens Extramural Softball at Monmouth College finished 
their season successfully with a 4 wins and2 lossrccord. 
Four other games were rained out and rescheduling proved to 
be a futile effort. This extramural event, reorganized this year, 
had a number of participants possibly due to the fact that 
there is little in the way of sports activities for women, unless 
they enjoy playing spectator. Due to this large number, many 
substitutions were made during games in order to play more 
girls. Several members of the team will be returning to next 
year's squad and hope to give the college a better record. 



The Monmouth College Extramural Basketball Team finished 
their season with a 3-3 record which is not so bad, when one 
considers that two of the losses were close decisions. The girls 
gave what they had and showed pride in their team, win or 
lose. According to Coaches Mary Fleming and Joe Cicarone, 
the team has several outstanding players who will be returning 
next year and will combine their efforts to give Monmouth a 
winning record. Both coaches were proud of the fine efforts 
which these girls gave to their school, as were the students who 
watched the games. 




Judie Collins prepares to throw the ball infield. 





BASKETBALL SCOREBOARD 






Augustana 


Opponent Monmouth 
24 36 


Knox 


Opponent 
29 


Monmouth 
28 


Spoon River 


50 47 


Bradley 


69 


40 


Bradley 


30 54 


Blackhawk 


31 


37 



122 



WRA Organizes 

To Form Two Teams 




From Left: Row 1: Gail Lowes, Johanna Lee, Eva Pendarvis, Ann Quick, Judy Vesely. Row 2: Coach Joe Ocarone, Barb Helmick, Linda Nelson, Jayne Rich- 
ey, Marsha Campbell, Jeri Lind, Mrs. Mary Fleming, assistant coach. 



123 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




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125 



Interfraternity Council 

The IFC governs the social fraternities in such matters as rushing and pledging as well as in those matters concerning the College and 
community endeavors of the fraternities. 




From Left: Row 1: Zack Stamp, Craig Helmick, Jim Staples, Gregg Miller, Andrew Kerr, Gordon Yocum. Row 2: Glenn Dagenais, 
Kelly Camp, Chuck Mitty, John Shea, Chuck Peter, Don Stons. Nick Tucker, Mike Kramer, Lew Hultgren, Bill Murschel. 

Panhellenic Council 

The Ranhell Council is important in promoting good relations between sororities, sponsoring all-campus activities, offering assistance 
to all girls interested in rush, and setting up general rush programs. 




From Left: Barb Taylor, Lucy Hyde, Marcia Miller, Kathy Wakolbinger, Debbie Swanson, Carol West, Judy Anderson, Lucy Steudel, 
Qndy Wead. 



126 



Alpha Tau Omega 




From Left; Row 1: Lew Hultgren, Denny Kistner, Chuck Donovan, Fred Schneiderman. Row 2; Steve Bacon, Tom Miller, Mike Powers, Dan Sperry, Joe Bog- 
gio, Steve Johnson, John Pisani, Les Huddle, Gary Macari, John Crum. Row 3: Laurel Hornbaker, Ann Quick. Pat Gladstone, Becky Buchen, \larcia Boso- 
vich, Cindy Dunmire, Kim Houran, Maggie Fottler, Alice Francis, Lanna Niedert, Chris Scotillo, Linda Matz, Peggy Zumpf, Julie FoUett. Row 4: Steve Hol- 
land, Jim Staples, John Scotillo, Ann Boley, Chris Odell, Mary Fogarty, Dianne Sheppard, Nancy Hayward, Jim Cassel, Jack Hode, Jim Lowe, Chuck Morgan, 
Scott Sandifer, Chris Edmonds, John Unterfranz, Bob Trombetta, Everett Lunn, Jeff Potts, John Tancredi. Row 5: Wes Meyers, Skip Pennucci, Elliot Krin- 
sky, Bruce Schwenneker. Window: Jack Sorenson. 

Little Sisters of the Maltese Cross 



127 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




From Left; Row 1: Robbie Johnson, Benzo, John Hammerel, Gary Madsen, AJice, Jan Blase, Jeff King, C. Elmer Berg, Ben Culver, Jim Anderson, Steve Eilers, 
Dave Swanson, Dave Perri, Mike Wessells, Joe Jacobs, Mike Palmer. Row 2: Al Smith, Dean Sipe, Bob Hudson, Gary Teplitsky, Dale Wetherbee, Don Qually, 
Bruce Kerback. Row 3: Fred Michael, Larry Wingate, Jeff Giroux. 



Little Sisters 

of 
Minerva 



From Left: Row I; Lee Parrish, Sue Lowery, Mary 
Gibson. Row 2: Vicki Bautch, Becky Statton, 
Carolyn Nelson, Marcia Ohhnger, Becki Salzman. 







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From Left: Row 1 : Carl Mullen, Scot Hamilton, Jeff Mayton, Steve Johnson, Joe Svoboda, Jeff Hubbard, Steve Pospischil, Mike Serruto. Row 2: Chip Cook 
Dennis Tavares, Don Storrs, Ross Oirisman, Keith Schmidt, Larry Kryzaniak, Randy Sojko, Dan Sfamurn, Steve Holder. Row 3: Stan Felix Rick Hanson 
Jeff Fort, Garrett Waecker, Jim Branda, Otis Seip, Qiris Campbell, Mitch LaPlant, Kurt Krucger. Row 4: Mike Goodwin, Wayne Smith, James Hopkins Ted 
Steinbrecher, Mike Kasuba, Brad Congdon, Colin Easier, Pete June, Dennis Clark. 




Sigma Phi Epsilon 

This past year represented another full one for the men of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
on the Monmouth CoUege campus. Reflecting back on the good and the bad 
experiences, one miglit say that the brothers from the "house with the red 
doors" had a pretty memorable 8 months. First term life centered around 
rush. Six weeks of smokers, open houses, hayrides, and live bands kept every- 
one pretty busy. Then came pledging and rush chairruan, Tom Hillison, 
brought forth a 27 man pledge class - the largest in recent history. Home- 
coming weekend the infamous 'Sig Ep Marching Kazoo Band' - a group of 
self-proclaimed musicians - tried to reproduce "The Wheel" into Kazoo style. 
Kicking off second term at the house was the annual all-house Christmas 
party with Santa, Lon Helton, presiding. Somehow though, Lon ended up in 
a shower rather than a sleigh. The gift -exchange highlighted the party, but 
Mike "Shadow" Goodwin's gift was the most useful. Also with second term 
came several more memorable events - the pledge trip to Iowa State, HELL 
WEEK, and activation. Tom Anderson and Sue Castignoli won't soon forget 
Tom's trip over to Liedman Hall where Sue seemed to be the center of 
attraction at an all-dorm meeting. The weeknight Keggerwith the Kappas 
and the Pi Phis threw some curve into the brothers study habits - but noth- 
ing that couldn't be ironed out. Third term began with a weekend visit by 
the AOW class of WIU on their walkout. Following that weekend adventure 
came the annual Spring Formal which will bring back fond memories for all 
the brothers and their dates. All in aU, a fine year of friendship and good 
times will be remembered by the brothers. Also, the brotherhood of Sigma 
Phi Epsilon wishes its best to our own graduating seniors and to the entire 
class of 1972. 



129 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 




From Left: Row 1 : Cyrus Ragan, Kirk Dobihal, Chris Farrington, Oiarlcs Hughes, Greg Smith, Donald McGaha, Jim Caldwell, Mike Kramer. Row 2: Thomas 
Roy, Charles Bushey, Gregory Parker, Oiris Lesniak, Phil Learon, RichMd Fenskc, Peter Barber, Frank Abel, Allen Scribncr, Lloyd Fish, Richard Gladinus, 
Rick Lehman. Row 3: Reggie Rairbairn, Peter Storms, Qiris Heller, Sherman Smith, Russell Barker, Andy Brackett, Steve Aldrich, Richard Kalwarski, Chip 
Bryce, Warren Wilson, Mike Zucco, Roy Bockler, Steve Shpak, Doug Adair, Frank Yankiewicz, Bob Kennedy, Buzz Johnson, Scott Huber, Tom Davis, Layla, 
James Logan, Qiuck Peter. 



130 



Theta Chi 




From Left: Row 1: Jeff Fry, Vem Vacala, Wayne Forsberg, Scott Crawford, Gregg Miller, Mike Pospischil, Bill Dusek. Row 2: John Nesladek, Dave 
Brinker, John Shea, Chuck Goehl, Bob Ruff. Row 3: Mike Woznicki, Rick Nord, Mike Cripe, Kerry Willis, Jim Rose, Paul Waszak. John Winkhaus, Mark 
Rueckert. Row 4: Steve Rueckert, Larry Greenwald, Matt Entrup, Dennis Plummcr, Bill Honeycutt, Rod Davies, Greg Derbak, Dick Porter, Ron Ozga, 
Chuck Mitty, Jim Garegnani, Mike Leber, Ben Dolton, Craig Helmick. 



131 



Zeta 
Beta 
Tau 



Pepsi 




From Left: Row 1 : Dave Charlcton, Andy Kerr, Gordon Yocum, Steve Fay, Ross Hart, Sac (Bag). Row 2: Rod Park, Guppy 
Strong, Gregg Schrciber, Roger Slaboch. Row 3: David Hartig, Thorn Mogan, Tom Joyce, Michael III, Ted Allen, Nicholas II, 
Glenn Dagenais, Don Hitchcock, Steve Eykamp, Rich Henle. 




From Left: Row 1 ; Diane Randall, Judy Vesely, Robin Waldron, Marilyn Cotterman, Marsha 
Spleha, Marcia Miller, Michelle Splcha, Carol Hladik. Row 2; Karen Moreo, Jacki Walter, Don- 
na Gardiner, Kathy Alexander. Not present: Jan Schroeder, Sue Mardjetko, Jan Gray, Carol 
Mullen. 



132 



J 




From Left: Row 1: Nancy Day, Maggie Bass, Anne Nelson, Darlcne Williams, Ginny Grice, Paula Behrcns, Ginger Phinkett, Vicki Lowdcr, Robin Waldron. 
Row 2: Linda Russum, Anne Murray, Jan Schceline, Chris Clark, Diane Randall, Debbie Carson, Edi Kern, Nancy Thompson, Sheri Martin, Susan Santowski, 
Pam Jamison, Wendy Dever, Kathy Wakolbinger. 




Alpha 

Xi 

Delta 



133 




F'rom Left: Row 1 ; Sue Lllen Vlasis, Kathy Savino, Beth Dale, Edwina Borowski, Lora Ozicmkowski, Jaync Richey. Row 2: Pat 
Kite, Sally Collier, Nancee Scliiever, Sally Young, Laura Amundson, Nanc Thompson, Cindy Wead, Leslie Smith, Marilyn Cotter- 
man, Maggie Gocrlieh. Row 3: Barb Wieand, Betsy Dixon, Amie Bastian, Pat Sindt, Pat Lydiard, Karen Ajamian, Maiy Auliff, Deb- 
by Peaco, Fva Pendarvis, Jo Jo Fiserman. 



Kappa Delta 



This past year lias proven that the Beta Gam- 
ma of Kappa Deha Chapter has many talen- 
ted sisters. Edwina Borowski received the 
Best Supporting Actress Award. The KD's 
placed second in overall intramural sports 
even though we lost our Softball pitcher. Sue 
Ellen Vlasis, when she slid safely into third 
base, dislocating her right shoulder. Some of 
the sisters were busy with their studies 
abroad in France, Columbia, England, and 
Italy. Scot Olympics and Scot Sing found 
our singers and athletes participating. Aside 
from tiie sports and the studies, some of the 
KD's are active in Warren Achievement and 
Jamison Center. We may be few in number 
but we are mighty in strength. 

Beta Gamma 
of Kappa Delta 




134 






vAi s^ 




Kappa 
Kappa 
Gamma 



'c-^',^ ^^>'^t^v-^^^^^<^^'- ?«?uf r,>r ■^«!i>i:s- 



-y- 



From Left: Row 1 : Cynthia Carman, Laurel Hornbaker. Mary Sanders, Lucy Hyde, Sally Probert, Becky Johnson. Row 2: Kim Houran, Marcia Miller, Ann 
Dohcrty, Linda Clark, Leslie Blair, Jacki Walter, Jan Gray. Row 3: Amy rensteniaker, Matie Almeida, Sue Mardjetko, Karen Avalos, Phyllis Foster, Gail Simp- 
son, Marcia Bosovich, Cathy Vogel, Sonia Montgomery, Sue Locandro, Nancy Erickson, Cliris Scotillo, Sue Lewis. Row 4: Marsha Spleha, Kathy Alexander, 
Lynettc Johnson, Cindy Dunmire, Sherry Snow, Becky Buchen, Kathy Lueder. Row 5: Pat Gladstone, Betsy Fellowes, Julie Van Cleve, Jane Fort, Cindy Crone, 
Brandi Bunker, Diannc Sheppard, Sue Prochaska, Marsha McKeon, Ann Boley, Linda Laughead, Judy Heniberger, Barb Taylor. 




135 



Pi Beta Phi 

I.e. Sorosis, the first national fraternity for 
women, was founded at Monmouth College 
at Holt House on April 28,1867. The frater- 
nity's name officially changed to Pi Beta 
Phi in 1888, and is known as the Alpha 
Chapter. This very house forms the back- 
ground for our picture. This year the Pi Phis 
have been very active - we won Scot Olym- 
pics, have had many intcr-fraternity ex- 
changes, successful "Duo" and Pledge for- 
mals, and were active in many community 
and college activities. The Pi Phis are proud 
of their heritage and proud of the spirit 
that's with them today. 








From Left: Row 1 : Zenobia Pugh, Gail I-'lagler, 
Amy Hollis, Pud, Sue Bansberg. Row 2: Michele 
Sploha, Lucy Stcudcl, Jean Masbery, Sue Davidson, 
Sue Stanley, Ginny Cummings, Debby Russell, 
Mary Grimes. Row 3: Judie Collins, Nancy Hay- 
ward, Maggie Ames, Terry Hewes, Kathy Deam, 
Mary I'ogarty, Dora Dombrow. Row 4: Kim Du- 
ringer, Nancy Larson, Louise Chavez, Linda Kink- 
el, Cass McMurray, Linda Johnson, Julie FoUett. 
Row 5; Jacki Grier, Lee Parish, Sue Rcid, Mary 
Gibson, Peggy Zumpf, Sandy Gates, Janet Bing- 
ham. Balcony: Row 1: Cathy Boubelik, Debbie 
Swanson, Marsha Theiscn. Row 2: Mary Ann 
Eiserman, Carol West. 




136 




From Left: Row 1 : Craig Patterson, Meg Leslie, Mark Sager, Mrs. Beezley (alias Boy Wonder), Mark Curran, Chet Rodenbush, Stud Ritt- 
haler, Ed Jones, Chuck Stahmer. Row 2: Rick Balfanz, Steve Keithley, Becky Statton, Greg Theobald, Mike Beezley, Diane Guzzi. 



Gibson Sunshine Club 




Beginning as a mere collection of unusual and diverse 
individuals with the sole purpose of attaining year- 
book picture status, the Gibson Sunshine Club has 
blossomed into a strong organization of still unusual 
and diverse individuals who have, at last, througli two 
years of meticulous planning, finally found them- 
selves among these hallowed pages. A great accom- 
plisliment indeed for those of us who are not among 
the elite campus society known as the Greeks. No 
hard feelings were intended through any of our 
Oracle offerings, but after all you fraternity and so- 
rority members do look a bit ridiculous sometimes. 
Actives and social members alike participated this 
past year in many exciting club functions such as the 
formal party at "Franks Place", pictured here, the 
Watermelon Seed Spitting Contest, and the Intra- 
mural Baseball Championship. Leaving us now are 
the hard-working seniors, who have been the back- 
bone of the club. Finally we pay tribute to our found- 
ers, Harold and Hazel, and to all the Geeps at Mon- 
mouth, who, without them, none of this would have 
been possible. So let a little Sunshine into your life - 
it only costs a nickel! 



137 



Blue Key 



Blue Key is the honor fraternity for junior and senior men who have attained 
campus distinction for service, leadership, and scholarship. 




From Left: Row 1 : Frank Yankiewicz, Cam McConnell, Sherm Smith and Gavel, William S. Daniel, Andrew D. Kerr. Row 2: Jeff 
Fort, Ted Steinbrecher, Bill Maakestad, Frank Cook, Donald Storrs, Wayne Fletcher, Jim Branda. 

From Left: Row 1: Qaudia Lawson, Anne Nelson, Karen Krueger, Janet Marty, Dr. Dorothy Donald. Row 2: Mary Auliff, Diane Guzzi, 
Lucy Hyde, Becky Johnson, Sue Bahnick. 




Mortar Board 



Mortar Board was formerly known as Tau Pi before 
becoming a national honorary society for senior 
women. Qualifications include leadership, service, and 
scholarship. A grade point average .3 higlier than all 
other junior women is required. 



138 




Alpha 

Lambda 

Delta 



Alpha Lambda Delta is the 
national honorary scho- 
lastic fraternity for fresh- 
men women. To qualify 
for membership, she must 
earn a 3.5 average during 
the first term, or a cumu- 
lative 3.5 average over the 
first two terms of the en- 
tire year. 



From Left: Row 1: Johanna Lee, Maureen Mostyn. Row 2: Sonia Montgomery, Alice Dunlap. Row 3: Deborah Van- 
derwilt, Mary Ann Kelly, Linda Nordstrom. 



From Left: Row 1: Dennis Elder, Dennis Hemma, Kirk Sanford, Ken Leslie, Bcrnie Piechalak. Row 2: Paul Suhs, 
Mike Hutmaeher. 




Phi 

Eta 
Mu 



Phi Eta Mu is the fresh- 
men's honorary scholastic 
fraternity. Any freshman 
who has attained a 3.5 
grade point average at the 
end of his first term, or a 
3.5 cumulative grade point 
at the end of second or 
third terms is eligible for 
membership. 



139 



Sigma 

Omicron 

Mu 

Sigma Omicron Mu is the 
upperclass honorary 
scholastic fraternity on 
campus. To be eligible 
for membership one 
must have completed 24 
term courses, 12 of 
which must have been 
taken at Monmouth or 
on a Monmouth-spon- 
sored program, with a 
grade point equivalent 
to an A in 19 courses 
and a C in the other five. 




DADING ZONE 0' 

From Left: Row 1 : Cynthia Carman, Carol Hladik, Linnea Bass. Row 2: Ginger Plunkett, Mary Ryder, Karen Krueger, Bob 
Fuessle, Laurel Hornbaker, Becky Johnson, Chip Cook, Bill Maakestad. 



Beta Beta Beta 



Beta Beta Beta is the national honorary biology fraternity. Membership is open to those students who meet the necessary 
grade and course requirements. 




From Left: Row 1 : Jan Hultgren, Bill Janda, Kirk Dobihal, Ginny Grice. Row 2: Thorn Mogan, Chuck Bushey, Jan Scheeline, Mary Auliff , 
Unda Cohen, Vicki Bautch. Row 3: Sue Ellen Vlasis, Ernie Roggclin, Lucy Harris, Dr. Benjamin Cooksey, Jim Caldwell, Russ Baker, Al 
Wentworth. Row 4: Fred Michael, Lew Hultgren, Tom Satterly, Roger Blachek. 



140 



Pi Gamma Mu 



Pi Gamma Mu is the national social science honor society. Membership is granted to those who have shown unusual interest and apti- 
tude in the study of the social sciences. 




From Left: Jeff Fort, William Daniel, Jim Branda, Kathy Wakolbinger, Bill Maakestad, Mike Kasuba, Karen Krueger, Dr. Herbsleb. 




From Left: Dr. Robert Gordon, Karen Moreo, Connie Brouillette, Alice Lawson, Mis. Watson, Dr. Guillermo, Steve Hart. 



Sigm^a 

Delta 

Pi 



Sigma Delta Pi is the 
national Spanish fra- 
ternity whose purpose 
is to further know- 
ledge and interest in 
Hispanic culture. 
Membership requires 
the completion of a 
300 level course in 
Spanish at Monmouth 
with a minimum 
grade average of a B 
in all Spanish courses. 
In addition, the over- 
all average must be at 
least 2.6. 



141 



Eta Sigma 
Phi 

Eta Sigma Phi is the inter- 
national college classics hon- 
orary fraternity. Membership 
is open to those undergrad- 
uates who have maintained a 
3.0 grade average in coUege 
Latin or Greek. 




From Left: Row 1 : Tom Manick, Alice Dunlap, Miss Bernice Fox, Gayle Mathis, Marsha Theisen. Row 2: Sue 
Bahnick, Beth Tanner, Joe Bartlow, Lea Ann Smoley, Mary Ryder, Jerry Wanless. 



Phi Alpha Theta 

Phi Alpha Theta is the international honorary history 
fraternity on campus. Membership is open to upper- 
classmen who meet its high scholastic requirements. 




From Left: Row 1: Paul Evans, Dr. George Tselos. Row 2: Dr. Cecil Brett, Dr. Gavin Davenport, Mrs. Alice Lawson, Reginald 
Fairbairn, Linnea Bass, Kathy Wakolbinger, Dr. William Urban, Mrs. Mary Crow, John Kjitzer. 



142 




National Collegiate 
Players 

Membership in the Monmouth College chapter of the Nation- 
al Collegiate Players is open to juniors and seniors who have 
outstanding records of dramatic participation and meet the 
national requirements. 



From Left: Row 1: Rick Johnson, Pam Jamison, Rog Blachck, Gayla 
Smith. Row 2: Marcia Pittle, Chuck Jackson, Dr. James De Young. 

From Left: Front: Jim BeckmanJ^ow 1 : Juicy Lucy, Nancy Day, Rick Johnson, Linda Russum, Chuck Jackson, Gayla 
Smith, Vicki Peel Sally Stalter, DruciUa Sawyer, Kendra Schank. Row 2: Carl Mullen, Joan Hayden, Edie Kern Karen 
Avalos, Jeann.ne Reade, Indian, Kilgore Trout, Blair Schultz, Jay Fox, Marcia Pittle, Roger Blachek. Row 3- Mark Pam 
Jamison, Dr. James De Young, Skip Whitten. 




Crimson 
Masque 



Crimson Masque is the 
College dramatic society. 
Membership is open to 
any interested student and 
no previous dramatic ex- 
perience is necessary. 



143 



Chamber Singers 




From Left: Row 1: Debbie Weir, Pat Kubina, Stan Felix, Val Hagenstein, Jane Fort, Anne Coen, Ted Steinbrecher. Row 2: 
Griffiths, Mary Auliff, John Bennett, Anne Buckhouse, Rik Spier, Bruce Kerback, Ann Boley, Bob Stern, Cindy Crone. 



Dick 



Choir 




From Left; Row 1: Debbie Weir, Gaye Reiser, Eva Pendarvis, Pat Kubina, Mary Auliff, Stan Felix, Bob Stern, Dan DuBois, Reggie Goulding, Cindy Dunmire, 
Sue Medford, Marcia Ohlinger. Row 2: Linda Russum, Lanna Nicdert, Anne Buckhouse, John Bennett, Linnea Bass, Debbie Carson, Nancy Peterson, Amy Fen- 
stemaker, Toni Barrett. Row 3: Dick Griffiths, Val Hagenstein, Cindy Crone, Jane Fort, Carl Mullen, Ron Barshinger, Ann Boley, Anne Coen, Mary Klein, Sue 
Helton. Row 4: Gary Wood, Bob Fullerton, Scott Stanton, Chip Cook, Dan Jaynes, Ted Steinbrecher, Jeff Fort, Rik Spier, Bruce Kerback, David Craig. 



144 




Center Photo. From Left: Row 1: Jeff Fort, John Bennett, Anne Coen, AJan Mertz. Row 2: Bruce Kerback, Anne Buckhouse, Scott Stanton, Val Hagenstein, 
Gary Wood, Debbie Weir. 



145 



ZZ3 



Highlanders 




From Left: Row 1 : Ginny Grice, Marsha Theisen, Elizabeth Tanner, Steven Pratt. Row2 : Linnea Bass, Dennis Elder, 
Fred Triebc. Row 3: Tom Jonaitis, Duncan Harter, Robert FuUerton. 



146 




BAAC 
Dancers 



From Left: Row 1: Qaudia Glover, Ann Dryden, Brenda Holloway. Row 2; Cynthia Mickey, Robin Calvin, 
Jacqueline Bingham. Row 3: Joyce Grant, Jurlean Market. 

From Left: Row 1: Karen Avalos, Sue Medford, Sharon Cassin, Drucilla Sawyer, Kendra Schank. Row 2: Alice Dun- 
lap, Ellen Cooper, Mary Jamison, Mary Kunde, Laura Beck, Helen Konstantinopoulos, Vicki Peel. 




Modern 
Dance 



147 



American Chemical Society 




From Left: Row 1: Lola Walsh, Abbas Salimian, Marianne Molendy. Row 2: Berwyn E. Jones, John Payne, Blair Schultz, David Belke, Eric Wagner, Randy 
Kopper, Mike Hayes. Row 3: Duncan Harter, Terry M. Nagel, Phil Fox, Reggie Seiders, Dick Mertineit. 



From Left: Row 1 : Bill Bluder, Rich Brown, Jeff Fort. Row 2: Dr. Herbsleb, Mike Kasuba, Gordon Yocum, Bill Maakestad. 



Econ 
Club 




148 



Psychology Club 




From Left: "Spiderman", Chuck Smith, Wayne Anderson, Sherman Smith, Diane Guzzi, Gayle Dyrness, Andrew Kerr, Carol 
Hadil^, Rita Wagner. 

Non-Current Events Club 




From Left: Charles Larrabee, Paul Titus, Steve Paulson, Beth Tanner, Kathy Wakolbinger, Dennis Elder. 



149 



International Club 




From Left: Tom Martin, Donna Frank, Dr. McClintock, Karen Krueger, Dennis Elder, Beth Tanner, Paul Titus, Ehigie W. Ebomoyi. 



150 



Association of Women Students 

All women are members of the Association. The executive group is composed of two elected members from 
the freshmen, sophomore, and senior classes, and six elected members from the junior class. The presidents of 
each of the women's residence halls are non-voting members. AWS concerns itself with programs and activities 
designed to promote the interests of all women students. 




From Left: Cindy Dunmire, Betty Travis, Phyllis Foster, Nancy Speer, Barb Brosted, Diane Rankins, Deborah Vanderwilt, 
Mary Jamison, Linda Indovino, Slinky, Mary Cummane 

Student Center Board 




From Left: Dan Jaynes, Jack Sorenson, John Frey,Thom Mogan, Andrew Kerr, Jay Fox, Frank Yankiewicz, John Scotillo, Marcia Miller, Chuck Jack- 
son 



151 




prcshman Squad. From Left: Alice I'rancis, Ann Dryden, Lanna Niedert, Becky Buchcn, Chris Scotillo 



Cheerleaders 




Mary practices flip with a little help! 



Varsity Squa 
Mary O'Roiir 


1. From Left: F 
ke, Julie FoUet 


low 1 : Marsha McKeon, I 
t. Row 3: Mary Fogarty. 


Caren Avalos. Row 2: 


1 


1 




^N^^^^^^l 1 ^^^^H 


B 








1 


f 


KA 


^^^H 



152 




Dolphins 



From Left: Row 1: Maggie I'ottlcr. Amic Bastian, Darloiie Williams, Alice Francis. Row 2: Wendy Dever, 
Sarah Scarritt, Pat Kite. Row 3 : Marcia Pittle, Nancy Tliompson, Paula Melton, Mrs. Mary Fleming. 



M-Club 




From Left; Row 1 : Mark Rueckert, Dave Brinker, John Shea, Dick Corn. Row 2: Steve Rucckert, Paul Waszak, Tom Satterly, Bob Mitchell, Dennis Biik- 
hofer. Row 3: Chas. Goehl, BillDusek, Jeff Langner, Bill Honeycutt, Ron Ozga. Row 4: Vernon Vacala, Kerry Willis, Dave Robinson, Tom Anderson, 
Greg Drije. Row 5: Mike Castillo, Kelly Camp, Dale Brooks, William Bencini. Row 6; Robert Trombetta, John Pisani, Steve Hart, Ted Allen, Coach 
Reichow. 



153 



ii 



cm mi ■ 



Student 
Association 



From Left: Greg Ellis, Wayne Fletcher. Not Pic- 
tured: Elaine Callahan, Cindy Harris, Bea Zavorski. 




Judicial Board 







From Left: Sherman Smith, Elaine Callahan, Kim Duringer, Chip Bryce. Not Pictured:Chris Heller, Becky Johnson, Jay Dement. 



154 



Student Senate 




From Left: Row 1 : Vicki Peel, Karen Krueger, Gail Flagler, Beth Dale, Cynthia Mickey, Glenn Dagenais, Andy Allen. Row 2: Ernie 
Burton, Rick Nord, Bill Murschel, Dan DuBois, Roger Slaboch, Chuck Morgan, David Brittain, James Bird. 



Executive Committee 



From Left: Row 1 : Wayne Fletcher, Elaine Callahan, Greg Ellis, Johanna Lee. Row 2: Norm Farmer, Cindy Harris, Jack Sor- 
enson, Chuck Jackson, Chip Cook, Bea Zavorski, Mrs. Mary Crow. 




155 



Communications Board 




From Left: Jeff ['ort. Rich Truog, Oiuck Jackson, Scott Baccker, Chris Farrington, Roy Bockler, Barbara Oliphant, Dave Boyd 



Oracle 



From Left: Bill Murschel, Steve Hart, Jo 
Ann Tanaka, Scott Hamilton, Roger Sla- 
boch, Richard Burton Truog. Not Pictured: 
Chuck Kukulski. 




156 



J 




Photo Lab 




Rick Shaefer 



Right Center: Stuart Smith 



From Left: Row 1: Barb OUphant, Dixie Hemsley, Jane Kurtz, Sue Currier. Row 2: Bob Mitchell, Edwina Borowski, 
Dcbi Shipplett, Ann Steger, Carl Shaub. 




Ravelings 



157 



Wells 
Elevator 




From Left: David Boyd, Duncan Hill 




WMCR 



From Left: Row 1: Dave Kinney, Joe Belmonte. Row 2: Alice Francis, 
Phyllis l-oster, Ann Dryden. Row 3: Judy Hogfeldt, Steve Waecker, 
Skip Whitten. Row 4: Steve Marcus, David Craig, Rik Spier. Row 5: 
Donna Simmons, Steve Keithley, Scott Baecker, FxJ Greene, Dan Du- 
Bois, Bill Pyatt. 



158 



Green Army 




From Left: Row 1 : F.E. Perdue, Qiff Sanner, Roy Dober, Lawrence White, Ed Day, Gus Benson, Dale Wasson, Omer Vollbracht, Row 2; Ray Swearingen, 
Minnie Totten, Helen Knight, Mary McCormick, Lee Peoples, Lois Sims, Gerald Pygott, BUI Burkitt, Dog Cheise. Row 3: Al Brinton, Solon Thompson, John 
Hennenfent, Ernest Klein, Phillip Kelly, Qetus Hart, Bill Simmons, George Breuer, Bernie Brown, John Luker. 



Saga 




From Left: Eunice Brantingham, Sarah Greenstri,tt, Lillian Salaway Bessie Whiteside, Fred Schultz, Carl Hamberg, Dale Buckert, Mgr., Gladys Little, Opal 
Schultz, Bob Dunston, F.S.D., Pam Fields, Marge Lefort, Maiy Letuit, Durutliy Miller, Chris Algren. 



159 




1 1 1 



"^r'r -i'^-'- 



II 

f If 

«• 
if 



i 



i 




?^ 



'^: 



±L 





CONCLUSION 



fi*^W 



161 




^^ 






162 



New year alarm buzzes and 

the school jerks awake 

yawning 

bewildered where am I 

then realization 

of the same old bed 

in a shifting room. 



Co-ed dorms and classes 

new students, deans, instructors 

all waking up to the possibility 

of teaching old dogs new tricks 

until 

a self-inflicted funeral pyre 

cries crisis. 



I I I 



i-5i---. 





163 




'^^'' 




164 




/ 




Crisis. 

Crisis met. 

Crisis past. 

You slept 

through it all. 

They've discovered a renewal 

to help with labor pains 

but you snored indecently 

during mourning 

and are missing birth while 

wiping dream-filled sleepflecks 

from your eyes. 






165 




Wake up. 

your shell has stayed intact too long 

your egg's begun to stink 

besides, you didn't become a symbol 

by wanting to snooze forever 

in little world privacy 

of an egg shell. 

If by reaching, breaking, tearing up 

you finally reach the world 

we may all be worth the while 

(then again, we all may not.) 



166 





167 



Bruised and wet and hairless 

the bird comes through again 

slamming out to 

dazzling light and warmth that 

touch the memory cords it seems 

of red and orange flames. 

I can touch the new awareness 

of every puzzled limb and 

the shock of waking up 

and finding me. 

Stretching out my skinness 

I discover that even 

accumulation 

has not overcome my chicken wings 

that cripple me in air. 









168 






169 




Well, perhaps this time 

I'll learn to fly 

if not 

I've only got five-hundred years 

to die before I live again. 

Wake up the phoenix bird 

and smash the shell 

before he learns to like 

his clammy death. 



170 



Student Index 



Abel, Frank 130 
Adaii, Doug 130 
Adkinson, Mike 109 
Ajamian, Kaien 90,134 
Aldrich, Steve 130 
Alexander, Kathy 90,132,135 
Allen, Andy 90,115,119,155 
Allen, Ted 90,1 14,132,153 
Almeida, Matie 135 
Ames, Maggie 136 
Amundson, Laura 134 
Anderson, James 70,128 
Anderson, Judy 70,126 
Anderson, R. 1 15 
Anderson, Tom 90,153 
Anderson, Wayne 149 
Angis, John 121 
Armstrong, Mike 70 
Aten, BiU 113,115 
Audet, Carmen 70 
AuUff, Mary 70,134,138,140 

144 
Avalos, Karen 90,135,143,147, 

152 
Avery, Don 105,115 



Bacon, Steve 127 
Baecker, Scott 156,158 
Bahnick, Sue 70,138,142 
Balfanz, Rick 70,137 
Bansberg, Sue 90,136 
Banwell, Wayne 70 
Baranski, Scott 71 
Barber, Peter 130 
Barker, Russ 130,140 
Barnett, Carl 90 
Barrett, Toni 144 
Barshinger, Ron 144 
Bartlow, Joe 71,142 
Easier, Colin 71,129 
Bass, Linnea 71,140,142,144, 

146 
Bass, Maggie 71,133 
Bastian, Amie 134,153 
Bath, Tim 71 

Bautch.Vicki 90,128,140 
Bayer. Chris 71 
Bayer, John 113 
Beck, Laura 147 
Beckman, Jim 90 
Beezley, Mike 90,120,137 
Beezley, Mrs. 137 
Behrens, Paula 133 
Belke, David 71,148 
Belmonte, Joe 90,158 
Bemko, Paul 71,105 
Bencmi, Bill 72.105,115,153 
Bengston, Dave 91,107 
Benka, Tom 107 
Bennett, John 144,145 
Bennett, Bob 115 
Berg, Charles 72,128 
Berles, Debbie 72 
Bernet, Hubert 72 
Bessert, Barry 1 13 
Bevans, Rich 107,109 
Biggs, Jim 72 
BUls, Scot 107 
Bingham, Jacqueline 147 
Bingham, Janet 91,136 
Bird, Jim 155 
Birkhofer, Dennis 105,153 
Blachek, Roger 140,143 
Blair, Leslie 135 
Blake, Pat 91 
Blanchard,Ted 72 
Blase, Jan 128 
Bluder, BUI 73.148 
Blyth, Chad 114 



Bockler, Roy 130,156 
Boggio, Joe 127 
Boley, Ann 127,135,144 
Booth, David 73 
Borchardt, Jerrold 73 
Borowski, Edwina 91,134,157 
Borsom, Bruce 91 
Bosovich, Marcia 127,135 
Boubelik, Cathy 73,136 
Boyd, David 120,156,158 
Brackett, Andy 130 
Branda, Jim 73,129,138,141 
Brewer, Thelma 9 1 
Brinker, Dave 105,131,153 
Brinton, Sheryl 73 
Brittain, Dave 91,155 
Brooks, Dale 73,105,106,115, 

153 
Brooks, Mary Ann 91 
Brosted, Barb 151 
Brouillette, Connie 141 
Brown, Bruce 115,116 
Brown, Dick 114 
Brown, Richard A. 73,148 
Brown, Tom 107 
Bryce, Chip 130,154 
Bryce, Rosemary 91 
Buchen, Becky 45,127,135,152 
Buchen, Pat 91,111 
Buckhouse, Anne 144,145 
Buell, John 105 
Bunker. Brandi 135 
Burk, Tim 105 
Burr, Marty 91 
Bushey. Chuck 130.140 
Burton, Ernie 155 
Buttner, Bill 91 
Byrnes, David 73 



Caldwell, Jim 74.130,140 
aUahan, Elaine 154,155 
CaUahan, Bill 107 
Calvin, Mike 74,109 
Calvin, Robin 91,147 
amp, KeUy 105,126,153 
&mpbell, Chris 129 
Campbell, Marsha 74,123 
Carman, Cynthia 91.135,140 
Carson, Debbie 133,144 
Carter, John 104,105 
Cassin, Sharon 147 
Castagnoli, Sue 91 
Castillo, Mike 109,153 
Cassel.Jim 127 
Center. Mike 74 
Charleton, Dave 132 
Chavez. Louise 136 
Chrisman. Ross 129 
Cicarone, Joe 74,123 
Clark, Ann 74 
Qark, Chris 133 
Qark, Dennis 91,107,129 
Qark, Linda 135 
Coen, Anne 144,145 
Cohen, Linda 140 
Corner, Ken 91 
CoUier, Sally 74,134 
CoUins, Judie 25,122,136 
Congdon, Bradley 74,129 
Connolly, Carla 91 
Conte, Joyce 75 
Cook, Chip 91,129,138,140, 

144,155 
Cooke. James 75 
Cooper, Ellen 147 
CoraUo, Sam 91 
Corn, Dick 75,111,153 
Corray, Mike 109 
Cotterman. Marilyn 92,132,134 
Co vie. Sue 75 
Craig, Dave 144.158 
Crawford, Scott 92,121,131 
Cripe, Mike 107,115,131 



Crone, Cindy 20,135,144 
Qooks, BiU 107 
Gum, John 107,127 
Culver, Ben 128 
Cummane, Mary 151 
Cummings, Ginny 136 
Curran, Mark 105,137 
Currier, Sue 157 
Custer, Shannon 92 



Dagenais, Glenn 126,132,155 
Dale, Beth 134,155 
Daniel, BiU 75,138,141 
Davidson, Sue 136 
Davies, Rod 105,131 
Davis, Don 107 
Davis, Tom 130 
Dawson, Marietta 75 
Day, Nancy 133,143 
Deam, Kathy 136 
De Bouck, Gerry 115 
Degerberg. Eric 76,1 14,120 
De Graf, Greg 176 
De Journo, Vic 76 
Derbak. Greg 107,131 
Dever. Wendy 133.153 
Dickens. Mike 105 
DUhn, Pat 92 
Dixon, Betsy 134 
Dobihal, Kirk 130,140 
Dodge, Tom 76 
Doherty, Ann 135 
Dolton, Ben 131 
Dombrow, Dora 136 
Donovan. Chuck 76,127 
Doyle, Mike 76 
Drain, Debbie 92 
Drije, Gregg 105.106.153 
Dryden, Ann 92,147,158 
Du Bois, Dan 144, 155,158 
Duchon. Frank 107 
Dunlap. Alice 92,139,142,147 
Dunmire, Cindy 127,135,144, 

151 
Dunn, Nancy 77 
Duringer, Kim 136,154 
DuRoss. Candy 92 
Dusek. Bill 105,131.153 
Duval, Dane 92 
Dyrness, Gayle 149 
Dzenis, Edward 92 



Easterly, Charles 92 
Ebomoyi. Ehigie 150 
Edmonds. Chris 127 
Edwards, Mark 92 
EUers. Steve 111.128 
Eiserman, Jo Jo 134 
Eiserman, Mary Ann 77.136 
Eiserman, Bob 77.1 15 
Elder, Dennis 139,146,149. 

150 
EUis, Greg 92,154,155 
Elmer, David 92 
Entrup, Matt 107,115,131 
Erickson, Nancy 92,135 
Evans, Paul 77,142 
Eykamp, Steve 132 



Fairbairn, Reggie 130,142 
Farmer, Norm 155 
Farmer, Richard 92 
Farrington, Chris 130,156 
Fay, Steve 92,132 
Fehx, Stan 129,144 
FeUowes, Betsy 135 
Fenn, John 77 
Fenske, Rich 130 
Fenstemaker, Amy 135,144 



Fen ton, MarshaU 77 

Finch. Karen 54.77 

Fish, Lloyd 92,130 

Hagler, GaU 136.155 

Rash. Al 77 

Fletcher, Wayne 138,154.155 

Fogarty, Mary 24.127.136,152 

FoUett, Julie 127,136,152 

Forsberg. Wayne 77.131 

Fort. Jane 92,135,144 

Fort, Jeff 77,129,138,141,144, 

145,148,156 
Foster, PhyUis 92.135,151,158 
Fottler, Maggie 93,127,153 
Fowler, Dan 77 
Fox, Jay 143,151 
Fox, PhU 148 
Francis, Alice 93.127,152,153, 

158 
Frank, Donna 77,150 
Friedman, Leah 93 
Fritz, Glenn 1 15 
Frey, John 151 
Fry. Jeff 131 
Fuessle. Bob 120.140 
FuUerton, Bob 78,144,146 
Fulton, Jim 93 
Funk, Doug 93 



Gardiner, Donna 93,132 
Garegnani, Jim 131 
Gates, Sandy 136 
GentUe, Bob 78 
Gibson. Mary 128,136 
Gillhouse, Tom 113 
Gilmore, Bruce 93 
Gilson, George 105 
Giroux, Jeff 128 
Gladinus, Rich 105,130 
Gladstone, Pat 93,127,135 
Gliva, Mike 107 
Glover Qaudia 93,147 
Goehl. Chuck 105,131,153 
Goerlich, Maggie 134 
Goodwin. Mike 78,129 
Gould, Chuck 78 
Goulding, Reggie 144 
Grant. Joyce 93,147 
Gray. Jan 135 
Greene. Ed 78,158 
Greenwald. Larry 115,131 
Gregg. Guy 78 
Grice, Ginny 133,140.146 
Grier, Jacki 136 
Griffin. WUliet 20 
Grimes, Mary 93.136 
Groff, Bill 78,107 
Guldenpfennig, Avis 93 
GuUhon, Jenny 20,78 
Gunzinger, Terry 78,105 
Guzzi. Dianne 78,137,138,149 



Haake, Pleasance 78 

Hagenstein.Val 78,144,145 

HaU, Dan 93 

HamUton. Scott 93.129.156 

Hammerel. John 128 

Handel. Bill 107 

Hanson. Rick 129 

Hardin, Doug 114 

Harris, Cindy 155 

Harris, Lucy 79,140 

Hart. Ross 94.132 

Hart, Steve 94,114,141,153, 

156 
Haiter, Duncan 146,148 
Hartig, Dave 132 
Hatzakis, Kathy 94 
Hayden, Joan 143 
Hayes. Mike 148 
Hayward, Nancy 94,127,136 



Heaton, Chris 79 

Heern, Randy 79 

Heller, Chris 130 

Helmick, Barb 66,79,123 

Helmick, Qaig 107,126,131 

Helton, Sue 144 

Hemberger, Judy 135 

Hemma, Dennis 139 

Hemsley, Dixie 157 

Henle, Rich 79,132 

Hennigan, Pat 105,106 

Hewes, Terry 136 

Hill, Duncan 79,158 

Hillison, Tom 94 

Hitchcock, Don 132 

Hladik, Carol 80,132,140,149 

Hoadley, Fred 94 

Hode, Jack 115,127 

Hode, Rich 115,117 

Hogan, Dianne 94 

Hogfeldt, Judy 94,158 

Holder, Steve 94,129 

Holland, Steve 127 

HoUis, Amy 136 

HoUoway, Brenda 94,147 

Honeycutt, Bill 105,131,153 

Hopkins, Jim 129 

Hopkms, Melmda 80 

Hornbaker, Laurel 127,135,140 

Houran, Kim 127,135 

Hubbard, Jeff 129 

Huber, Mike 95,107 

Huber, Scott 130 

Huddle, Les 115,127 

Hudson, Bob 128 

Huey, Jim 120 

Hughes, Charles 130 

Hultgren, Jan 95,140 

Hultgren, Lew 126,127,140 

Hund, Ruth 80 

Hunter, Don 110,111,112 

Hutchinson, Shelley 95 

Hutmacher, Mike 113,139 

Hyde, Lucy 80,126,135,138 



Indovino, Linda 151 
Isaacson, Rosemary 80 
Iverson, Mary Sue 80 



Jackson, Chuck 143,151,155, 

156 
Jacobs, Joe 128 
Jacobs, Sue 95 
Jahnel, Marty 80 
Jamison, Mary 147,151 
Jamison, Pam 133,143 
Janda, BiU 140 
Jaynes, Dan 44,151 
Jennrich, Karl 80,105 
Johnson, Becky 81,135,138,140 
Johnson, Buzz 130 
Johnson, Gail 81 
Johnson, Lmda 136 
Johnson, Lynette 135 
Johnson, Marjorie 95 
Johnson, Rick 81,143 
Johnson, Robbie 128 
Johnson, Stephen 81,127 
Johnson, Steven 129 
Johnston, Barb 81 
Jonaitis, Tom 146 
Jones, Ed 81,137 
Jordan, Phil 115,116 
Joslyn, Jan 81 
Joyce, Tom 132 
June, Pete 129 



Kabat, Henry 95 
KaUas, Barb 95 



Kalwarski, Rich 130 
Kamigaki, Burt 39 
Kaicher, Dick 120 
Karczewski, Denise 95 
Karl, Dan 95 

Kasuba, Mike 129,141,148 
Katz, Frank 66 
Katz, Marty 81 
Kauzlarich, Toni 81 
Keith, David 64 
Keithley, Steve 81,137,158 
Kelly, Mary Ann 139 
Kennedy, Bob 119,130 
Kerback, Bruce 128,144,145 
Kern, Edie 95,133,143 
Kerr, Andy 126,132,138,149, 

151 
Kijek, Stan 95 
Kimber, Anne 95 
King, Jeff 95,128 
King, Laurel 95 
Kinkel, Linda 136 
Kinney, Dave 81,158 
Kipp, Pat 81 
Kircher, Al 114 
Kistner, Denny 127 
Kite, Pat 82,134,153 
Klein, Mary 144 
Klenk, Jean 95 
Kolb, Teresa 82 

Konstantinopoulous, Helen 147 
Kopper, Randy 95,148 
Kramer, Mike 126,130 
Kratochvil, Tom 105,109 
Krinsky, Elliott 107,127 
Kritzer, John 142 
Kiueger, Karen 82,138,140,141, 

150 
Krueger,Kurt 109,129 
Kryzaniak, Larry 129 
Kubina, Pat 95,144 
Kucharz, Joe 82,105 
Kuhnkey, Mike 107 
Kunde, Mary 82,147 
Kurtz, Jane 157 



Langner, Jeff 153 
Lannan, John 95 
La Plant, Mitch 129 
Larrabee, Chuck 95,149 
Larson, Nancy 136 
Laughead, Linda 135 
Lawson, Alice 141,142 
Lawson, Claudia 82,138 
Leahon, BiU 82 
Learon, Phil 130 
Leber, Mike 131 
Lee, Johanna 27,95,123,139, 

155 
Lehman, Rick 130 
Lehmann, T, 115 
Lenhart, Kathy 82 
LesUe, Ken 96,139 
Leslie, Meg 96,137 
Lesniak, Chris 120,130 
Lewis, Sue 96,135 
Lind,Jeri 82,123 
Littler, Juhe 54 
Locandro, Sue 96,135 
Logan, Jim 130 
Long, Kathy 66,82 
Longer, J. 105 
Lorenz, Frank 82 
Lowder,Vicki 96,133 
Lowe, Jim 107,127 
Lowery, Sue 128 
Lowes, Gail 62,123 
Lucas, Lucy 96 
Lueder, Kathy 96,135 
Lunn, Everett 111,127 
Lydiard, Norm 96,121 
Lydiard, Pat 82, 

134 



Maakestad, Bill 138,140,141, 

148 
Macari, Gary 83,127 
Macari, Larry 83 
Madsen, Gary 128 
Mahnic, Lynne 96 
Malsbury, Jean 96 
Manick, Tom 142 
Manner, Bob 83 
Marcus, Steve 96,158 
Mardjetko. Sue 20,135 
Market, Jurlean 96,147 
Martin, Sheri 133 
Martin, Tom 83,150 
Marty, Janet 83,138 
Masberg, Jean 136 
Mathis, Gayle 142 
Matz, Linda 127 
Mayer, Tom 27,1 15 
Mays, Precious 96 
Mayton, Jeff 129 
McConnell, Cam 83,138 
McGaha, Don 130 
McKeon, Marsha 135,152 
McMurray, Cass 136 
McWethy, Sally 18 
Means, Dave 107 
Meckfessel, Dick 83,111 
Medford, Sue 144,147 
Meers, John 66 
Mellekas, Jim 107 
Melton, Paula 153 
Mercer, Trudy 96 
Mertineit, Dick 83,148 
Mertz, Alan 145 
Messenger, Wendy 96 
Meyer, Mary Ann 96 
Meyers, Tom 105 
Meyers, Wes 113,127 
Michael, Fred 128,140 
Michael, Jan Freeman 19,20,84 
Michael, Bob 84 
Mickey, Cynthia 147,155 
Mikula, Ed 84 
Miller, Gregg 126,131 
Miller, Marcia 126,132,135, 

151 
Miller, Tom 107,127 
Minor, Grant 107,121 
Mitchell, Harold 84 
Mitchell, Bob 84,153,157 
MitcheU.Tom 84,105 
Mitty, Chuck 126,131 
Mogan, Thom 84,132,140,151 
Molendy, Marianne 84,148 
Mongan, Dave 97 
Montgomery, Sonia 97,135,139 
Moody, Doug 84 
Moran, Deborah 97 
Moreo, Karen 132,141 
Morgan, Chuck 127,155 
Morgan, Becky 97 
Morris, Wes 84 
Mostyn, Maureen 97,139 
Moy, Calvin 84 
Moyers, Cathy 97 
Mullen, Carl 129,143,144 
Mulville, George 84 
Murray, Anne 97,133 
Murschel, Bill 97,126,155, 

156 
Muzik, Andy 97 



Nelson, Anne 85,133,138 
Nelson, Carol 85,128 
Nelson, Linda 97,123 
Nelson, Vicky 97 
Nelson, BiU 105 
Nesladek, John 131 
Nichols, David 143 
Niedert, Lanna 127,144,152 
Nord, Rick 131,155 
Nordstrom, Linda 139 



Novak, Jack! 85 



OdeU, Chris 127 
Ohlinger, Marcia 59,128,144 
Oliphant, Baib ^■' "^6,157 
O'Rourke, Mary 152 
Ozga, Ron 97,105,131,153 
Oziemkowski, Lora 134 



Palmer, Mike 128 
Park, Rodney 97,132 
Parker, Carol 97 
Parker, Greg 130 
Parrish, Lee 128,136 
Patterson, Bob 111 
Paterson, Craig 85,137 
Paulson, Steve 97,149 
Pavone, Lou 113 
Payne, John 148 
Payne, Lonna 85 
Peaco, Debbie 98,134 
Peel, Vicki 98,143,147,155 
Peevler, Gary 98,105 
Pendarvis, Eva 123,134,144 
Pennucci, Skip 113,127 
Perri, Dave 128 
Peter, Chuck 126,130 
Peterson, Nancy 85,144 
Piechalak, Bernie 98,139 
Pinkus, Steve 107 
Pisani, John 105,127,153 
Pitanello, Dave 107 
Pittle, Marcia 143,153 
Plummer, Dennis 105,131 
Plunkett, Ginger 85,133,140 
Porento, Ed 98 
Porter, Dick 131 
PospischU, Mike 98,105,131 
PospischU, Steve 129 
Potts, Jeff 127 
Powers, Dave 85 
Powers, Mike 127 
Pratt, Bob 105 
Pratt, Steven 146 
Probert, SaUy 86,135 
Prochaska, Sue 135 
Pugh,Zenobia 98,136 
Purington, Steve 114 
Pyatt, BiU 98,158 
Pynckel, Gary 105 



QuaUy,Don 128 
Quick, Ann 98,123,127 



Ragan, Cy 119,130 
Ralph, Norman 113 
Randall, Dianne 27,98,132 
Rankins, Diane 98,151 
Reade, Jeannine 143 
Reid, Sue 136 
Reiser, Gaye 86,144 
Reynolds, Mark 105 
Richards, Mike 98,115 
Richey, Jayne 98,123,134 
Ritthaler, Stud 98,137 
Robertson, Gordon 86 
Robinson, Dave 86,1 14,153 
Robinson, Doug 98 
Rodenbush, Chet 24,137 
Roggelin, Ernie 86,140 
Rose, Jim 107,131 
Roy, Tom 105,130 
Rueckert, Mark 105,115,131,153 
Rueckert, Steve 105,115,117, 

131,153 
Ruff, Bob 86,131 
RusseU, Debra 25,136 
Russum, Linda 133,143,144 
Ryder, Mary 86,140,142 



172 



Sager, Kevin 98 

Sager, Maik 86,1 10.1 1 1,1 12, 

137 
Salimian, Abbas 98,148 
Salvato, Linda 86 
Salzman, Becki 98,128 
Sanders. Mary 86,135 
Sandifer, Scott 107,127 
Sanford, Kiik 139 
Santowski, Sue 133 
Sattorly,Tom 115,140,153 
Savino, Kathy 134 
Sawyer, Drucilla 98,143,147 
Scarritt, Sarah 86,153 
Schaefer, Rick 86,157 
Schank, Kendra 99,143,147 
Scheeline, Jan 133,140 
Schiever, Nancee 87,134 
Schlicksup, Bob 113 
Schmidt, Keith 1 29 
Schneider, Debra 99 
Schnciderman, Fred 127 
Schreiber. Gregg 132 
Schiiltz. Blair 87,143,148 
Schurr, Joe 99.107 
Scotillo, Oiris 127.135.152 
Scotillo. John 87.127.151 
Scribner.Don 107.130 
Seiders. Reggie 87.148 
Seip. Otis 129 
Seiple, Bill 115 
Serriito. Mike 107,129 
Sfamurri, Dan 99,129 
Shaub, Carl 99,157 
Shea, John 121.126,131,153 
Shepherd, Allen 99,105,1 15 
Sheppard, Dianne 99,127,135 
Shipplett,Debi 99,157 
Shpak, Steve 130 
Simmons, Donna 99,158 
Simpson, Gail 135 
Sindt, Pat 134 
Sipe, Dean 128 
Slaboch. Roger 132,155,156 
Slavicek, BiU 99 
Smith. Al 128 
Smith. Chuck 149 
Smith, Gayla 143 
Smith, Greg 130 
Smith, LesUe 99,134 
Smith, Mike 113 
Smith, Pat 99 
Smith, Sherman, 87,130,138, 

149,154 
Smith, Stuart 157 
Smith, Wayne 129 
Smoley, Lea Ann 87,142 
Smyth, John 99 
Snow. Sherry 135 
Sojko, Randy 129 
Sorenson, Jack 120,127.151, 

155 
Spaulding, Jeannine 67 
Speer, Nancy 151 
Sperry, Dan 127 
Spier, Rik 144,158 
Spleha, Marsha 99,1 32,135 
Spleha, Michelle 132,136 
Stach, Carl 114 
Stahmer, Chuck 100,137 
Staley, Keith 107,109 
Stalter, SaUy 143 
Stamp, Zach 107,126 
Stanley, Sue 136 
Stanton, Scott 144,145 
Staples, Jim 100,126,127 
Station, Becky 100,128.137 
Steele, Karen 100 
Steger, Ann 100,143,157 
Steinbrecher. Ted 129,138,144 
Stephens, Ann 87 
Stern, Bob 144 
Steudel, Lucy 126,136 
Stickles, Doug 1 1 3 
Stone, Steve 100 



Storms, Pete 130 
Storrs, Don 100,126,129,138 
Stotlar, Joe 105 
Strong, Guppy 132 
Stryjewskj, Larry 105 
Stutz, Jim 87 
Sullivan, Barb 100 
Suhs, Paul 139 
Sumner, Hugh 87 
Svoboda, Joe 129 
Swanson, Dave 111,128 
Swanson, Debbie 126,136 
Swartz, Mark 115 
Szowkowyh, Antonia 87 



Tanaka, Jo Ann 156 

Tancredi, John 1 13,127 

Tanner, Beth 142,146,149,150 

Tavares, Dennis 129 

Taylor, Barb 126,135 

Taylor, Cathy 87 

Teplitsky, Gary 128 

Theisen, Marsha 88,136,142.146 

Theobald, Greg 88,137 

Thomas, Sue 88 

Tliomas, Tom 88 

Thompson, Bill 105 

Thompson, Keith 100 

Thompson, Nancy A. 133,153 

Titus, Paul 88,149,150 

Toliver, Eddie 107 

Traff, David 88 

Travis, Betty 151 

Triebe, Fred 146 

Trigillo, Sam 88 

Triner. Sue 100 

Trombetta, Bob 105,109,127, 

153 
Truog, Rich 100,156 
Tucker. Nick 126,132 



Unterfranz. John 107,115,127 



Vacala, Mike 109 

Vacala, Vern 131,153 

Vana, Barb 88 

Van Qeve, Julie 100,135 

Vanderwilt, Deborah 100,139, 

151 
Van Drie, Brenda 27 
Vesely, Judy 123,132 
Vistein, Joel 115 
Vlasis, Sue Ellen 134,140 
Vogel, Cathy 135 
Volz, Joy 88 



Waecker, Garrett 109,129 

Waecker, Steve 108,109,158 

Wagner, Bill 115 

Wagner, Eric 88.114.148 

Wagner, Rita 88,149 

Wajda. Paul 100 

Wakolbinger, Kathy 88.126,133, 

141,142,149 
Waldron, Robin 101,132,133 
Walker, Al 27 
Walsh, Lola 89,148 
Walter. Jacki 101.132,135 
Wanless, Jerry 101,142 
Waszak, Paul 105,131,153 
Wead. Cindy 101.126,134 
Weaver, Shirley 101 
Weber, Dan 101 
Weir, Debbie 144,145 
Wells, Jim 119 
Wells, Randy 121 
Wentworth, Al 140 
Wessells, Mike 128 



West, Carol 89,126,136 
Wetherbee, Dale 128 
Wheeler, Jim 101,108,109 
Whitaker. Debbie 101 
Whitaker, Delores 101 
Wltitcomb. Dave 89 
Whitmore, Jim 105.111 
Whitten. Skip 143.158 
Wieand, Barb 134 
Williams, Arthur 107 
Williams, Darlene 101,133,153 
WUliams, Rick 89 
Williams, Tracey 1 19 
Willis, Kerry 109,131.153 
WUson, Cynthia 89 
Wilson, Gloria 101 
Wilson, Warren 105,130 
Wingate. Larry 128 
Winkhaus. John 131 
Wold. Robb 89 
Wood, Gary 144,145 
Woznicki, Mike 131 



Yankiewicz, Frank 89,130,138, 

151 
Yochelson, Roger 114,143 
Yocum, Gordon 101,126,132,148 
Young, Delsie 101 
Young, Gary 89 
Young, Sally 101.134 



Zavorski, Bea 101,155 
Zimmerman. Bill 101 
Zucco, Mike 130 
Zumpf, Peggy 127,136 



Faculty and 
Staff Index 



Algren, Chris 159 
Allison, David C. 50 
Arrison, John D. 58 



Ball, Ewood 45 
Bainett, Robert H. 48 
Behring, Daniel 44 
Benson, Gus 159 
Blender, James A. 48 
Blum, Harlow B. 49 
Boone, Gilbert 49 
Boone, Katherine 49 
Bo swell, Grace H. 55 
Boswell, R. Dean Jr. 58 
Bowman, Milton, L. 50 
Brasel, Carol V. 58 
Bratingham. Eunice 159 
Brett, Cecil C. 52,56,57,142 
Breuer, George 159 
Brinton. Al 159 
Brown, Bernie 159 
Brown, John A. M. 47 
Buchholz, Robert H. 50 
Buckert, Dale 159 
Burkitt. BiU 159 



Cooksey, Benjamin 50,140 

Cramer. Paul 58 

Crow, Mary B. 57,142.155 



Daniel. Earl 46 



Davenport, F. Garvin 57,142 

Day, Ed 159 

De Young, James L. 67.143 

Dober, Roy 159 

Donald, Dorothy 138 

Dunston, Bob 159 



Ebersole, James B. 45 
Ehlert, David L. 58 
Epley, Dean 66 
Evans, Calvin W. 55,120 



Fields, Pam 159 
Fleming. David D. 47 
Fleming. Mary H. 62.123,153 
Fox, Bernice L. 52,142 
Foxen, John R. 67 
Fritschi, Helen V. 59 



Gordon, Robert A. 59,141 
Greenstreet, Sarah 159 
Griffiths, Richard 32.60.144 
Guillermo. Edenia59.141 



Hamberg. Carl 159 
Hart, Cletus 159 
Hastings, Margaret 59 
Hastings, William 64 
Hauge, Harris R. 43 
Hennefent, John 159 
Herbsleb, James R. 53,141,148 
Herman. Richard S. 66 
Hildreth. Richard O. 48 
Holland. Ceola J. 45 
Humphrey. Ruby I. 44 
Hurh, Won M. 66 
Hutchins. William M. 48 



Johnson, A. Franklin 63 
Johnson, J. Prescott 61 
Jones, Berwyn E. 51,148 



Kelley, PhiUip 159 
Kennedy, Adele 55 
Ketterer, John J. 50 
Kettering, Donald W. 46 
Klein, Ernest 159 
Kloeppel, Peter K. 63 
Knight, Helen 159 
Knoche, 54 



Leever, Richard S. 55 
Lefort, Marge 159 
Lefort, Mary 159 
Liedman, Jean E. 67 
Lin, Chi Yung 56 
Lin, Vo 54 
Uttle, Gladys 159 
Loya, Eileen 42 
Loya, Heimo A. 60 
Luker, John 159 



Marshall. James W. 45 
Matthews, Margaret 49 
McQanahan. Paul H. 44,65 
McOintock, Roy Jr. 56,150 
McCormick, Helen 159 
McKenna, Frank S. 43 
McNamara, R. Jeremy 43, 
55 



173 



Meliska, Charles J. 64 
Metzgcr, Sue 44 
Miller, Dorothy 159 
Moulding, Murray 33,55 

Nagel, Terry 51,148 
Nellis, William J. 63 
Nichols, John E. Jr. 43 
Novak, Witold 43 



Osborne, Harry W. 59 



Pelham, Lee E. 54 
Peoples, Lee 159 
Perdue, F.E. 159 
Petersen, Quentin 51 
Peterson, Gracie 60 
Pygott, Gerald 159 



Raicevich, John R. 105 
Rankin, Glen D. 47 
Reichow, WUliam 62,105,106, 

109,121,153 
Reyner, 1 14 
Ryan, Thomas 60 



Salaway, Lillian 159 
Sanner,aiff 159 
Schultz, Fred 159 
Schultz, Opal 159 
Senn, David J. 64 
Shawver, Benjamin T. 54 
Shoemaker, Homer L. 53 
Simmons, Bill 159 
Sims, Lois 159 
Speel, Qiarles J. H 65 
Spitz, Douglas R. 57 
Sproston, Michael 60 
Steger, Jack 62,105,107 



Stine, Richard D. 39,42 
Swearingen, Ray 159 



Taylor, D. Wilson 45 
Theurer, Hans 53 
Thompson, Samuel M. 61 
Thompson, Solon 159 
Totten, Minnie 159 
Tselos, George D. 57,142 



Urban, William L. 57,119,142 



Vollbracht, Omer 159 



Waltershausen, George 49 
Wasem, Jim L. 62,105,107,11 1 



115 
Wasson, Dale 159 
Watson, 141 
Weber, P. 107 
Weeks, J. Stafford 65 
White, Lawrence 159 
Whiteside, Bessie 159 
Willhardt,Gary D. 55 
Williams, Lyman O. 56 
Wills, Donald L. 56 
Wilson, Carolyn A. 45 
Wingo, Charles 54 
Winkler, Robert L. 48 
WoU, Robert G. 62,105,111, 

113 
Woodall, Dewey 53 
Woodward, Karen M. 59 
Wright, A. Dean 64 



Young, Gordon K. 48 



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175 






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A time gjtinfocence, 
A time 6j<bonfidences. 
Long ago. . .it must be. . 
I have a photograph. 
Preserve your memories; 
They're all that's left you 



■ Paul Simon 




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THE PHOENIX BIRD - sacred to the ancient 
Egyptians as a symbol of immortality and rebirth. 
This mythological creature reportedly lived for periods 
of five hundred years. After its life span, the Phoenix 
would be consumed in a self-inflicted funeral pyre. 
Flames of crimson, orange, and yellow engulfed the 
huge bird; it expired in a tremendous cloud of fire 
and smoke. When the ashes had cooled, there remained 
a small egg - and from this the new Phoenix emerged, 
reborn with strength and wonder superior to that 
which it had possessed before. 
. . . From the ashes of past glories, there emerges a 
new beginning - and hopes for a brighter future . . .